NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory Launched

Major NSF Astronomy Initiative starts 1 October 2019


  • newswise-fullscreen NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory Launched

    Credit: National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory/AURA/NSF/P. Marenfeld

    Telescopes from the five infrastructures

  • newswise-fullscreen NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory Launched

    Credit: National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory/AURA/NSF/P. Marenfeld

    Key visual for the NSF National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

  • newswise-fullscreen NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory Launched

    Credit: National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory/AURA/NSF/P. Marenfeld

    Telescopes from the five infrastructures

Newswise — On 1 October 2019, the nighttime astronomy facilities supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) transitioned to operating as one organization, NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory. The new organization operates five scientific programs: Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, the Community Science and Data Center, Kitt Peak National Observatory (all formerly known as the National Optical Astronomy Observatory); Gemini Observatory and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, and is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy. 

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) are proud to announce the launch of integrated operations of all of NSF’s nighttime astronomical facilities under NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory (NSF’s OIR Lab). This new organization is the preeminent US center for ground-based optical-infrared astronomy, enabling breakthrough discoveries in astrophysics by developing and operating state-of-the-art ground-based observatories and providing data products and services for a diverse and inclusive community.

Patrick McCarthy New Director

NSF and AURA are also pleased to announce the appointment of Patrick McCarthy as the Director of NSF’s OIR Lab. McCarthy was most recently Vice President of the Giant Magellan Telescope project and Astronomer at the Carnegie Institution for Science. McCarthy said of the new organization, “Integrating these facilities into one multi-mission center brings together diverse pathways for astronomical exploration, facilitates community coordination, and enables the discoveries of the future. The integrated center will also stimulate new domestic and international collaborations and provide additional opportunities for staff while expanding scientific capabilities and improving the experience for users.”

Over 60 Years of Optical-Infrared Astronomy

Since 1958, NSF has sponsored ground-based optical-infrared astronomical research facilities in the US and Chile managed by AURA. The first site developed was Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) in Arizona, followed soon after by Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. In 2000 the Gemini Observatory in Hawai’i and Chile began operations, funded by NSF and an international consortium. The most recent addition, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), currently under construction in Chile, is a cutting-edge observatory sponsored by NSF and the US Department of Energy.

All of these NSF facilities are managed by AURA but were previously structured as separate organizations. The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) operated the telescopes on Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo and the Community Science and Data Center (CSDC). Separately, AURA first managed Gemini Observatory as well as the LSST construction project. On 1 October, NOAO, Gemini Observatory, and LSST’s operations component transitioned to a single management structure, and the NOAO name was retired. As LSST finishes construction, the ramped-up operations will become an integral component within NSF’s OIR Lab with full operations beginning in 2022.

Programs

Through its five programs — Cerro Tololo, CSDC, Gemini, Kitt Peak and LSST — NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory serves as a focal point for community development of innovative scientific programs, exchange of ideas, and creative development. The lab’s infrastructure enables the astronomy community to advance humanity’s understanding of the Universe by exploring significant areas of astrophysics, including dark energy and dark matter, galaxies and quasars, the Milky Way, exoplanets, and small bodies in our own Solar System.

“We are excited to see NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory become a reality,” said Anne Kinney, NSF’s Assistant Director for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. “This new national lab will strengthen NSF-sponsored capabilities, which are at the forefront of international astronomical research. NSF’s newest astronomy research laboratory combines a wide array of existing and new facilities into one multifaceted center for ground-based optical-infrared astronomy research and technology development.”

Cutting-Edge Research

One of the five programs, LSST, which will begin its survey in 2022, will revolutionize time-domain astronomy by detecting and reporting 10 million astronomical events per night. CSDC staff and collaborators are creating software systems capable of filtering and prioritizing the LSST alert stream in real time, and the telescopes of NSF’s OIR Lab are developing powerful and dynamic new capabilities for rapid-response follow-up observing and data analysis.

NSF’s National Optical-infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory also creates new opportunities in astronomical research with its extensive data archives by connecting the unprecedented imaging survey data set from LSST with datasets from, for instance, the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on Cerro Tololo’s Blanco Telescope at CTIO in Chile and the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) on the Mayall 4-meter Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona. By coordinating the services of the LSST Science Platform and the CSDC Data Lab, NSF’s new national lab will become a world-leading data-science facility supporting access, queries and analysis of these and other petascale datasets.

The Gemini Observatory’s unique 8.1-meter telescope capabilities in both hemispheres allow rapid follow-up on 8-meter-class telescopes of targets identified by LSST and other time-domain experiments. Gemini is enhancing its existing ability to quickly respond to time-domain and multi-messenger astronomy targets as part of an NSF-funded project called GEMMA [1]. 

In addition to its role as a community gateway to facilities and datasets throughout the optical-infrared system, this national lab serves as the focal point for coordinating complementary observations using other experimental techniques. These capabilities will be fundamental to the NSF multi-messenger astronomy mission, particularly in coordination with gravitational wave and particle astrophysics facilities.

Matt Mountain, AURA President, commented on the new NSF astronomy lab, “These are exciting times for astrophysics. For example, both the discoveries of exoplanets and the rise of multi-messenger astronomy are driving the creation across the globe of ever-more audacious observational facilities. By bringing together the talent and creativity of our three existing centers — NOAO, Gemini and LSST — we have created a new NSF lab to respond to these observational opportunities. This new organization is focused on scientific, technical, and managerial excellence in the service of our community to enable new science and future breakthroughs in astrophysics.”

Notes

[1] GEMMA, a contraction of Gemini in the Era of Multi-Messenger Astronomy, is developing powerful new adaptive optics instrumentation and infrastructure to accommodate the flood of data expected from LSST and other facilities such as LIGO.

More Information

About the NSF National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, the US center for ground-based optical-infrared astronomy, operates the Gemini Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), the Community Science and Data Center (CSDC), and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). It is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with NSF and is headquartered in Tucson, Arizona. The astronomical community is honored to have the opportunity to conduct astronomical research on Iolkam Du’ag (Kitt Peak) in Arizona, on Maunakea in Hawai’i, and on Cerro Tololo and Cerro Pachón in Chile. We recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that these sites have to the Tohono O’odham Nation, to the Native Hawaiian community, and to the indigenous peoples of Chile, respectively.

Links

Contacts

Lars Lindberg Christensen
Head of Communications, Education & Engagement
Email: lchristensen@aura-astronomy.org
Phone/cell: +49 173 38 72 621

Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy
Shari Lifson
Corporate Communications Coordinator
Email: slifson@aura-astronomy.org
Phone: +1 202 769 5232

 

/////////////////////////Spanish Translation///////////////////////////////////////

 

Lanzamiento del Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF

La Gran Iniciativa de Astronomía de la NSF comienza el 1 de octubre de 2019

El 1 de octubre de 2019, las instalaciones astronómicas de observación nocturna apoyadas por la Fundación Nacional para las Ciencias (NSF) pasaron por una transición para operar como una sola organización: el Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF. La nueva organización opera cinco programas científicos: el Observatorio Interamericano Cerro Tololo, la Ciencia Comunitaria y Centro de Datos, el Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak (todos anteriormente conocidos como el Observatorio Nacional de Astronomía Óptica – NOAO); el Observatorio Gemini y el próximo Gran Telescopio para Rastreos Sinópticos), bajo la administración de la Asociación de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía.

La Fundación Nacional para las Ciencias (NSF) y la Asociación de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía (AURA) están orgullosos de anunciar el lanzamiento de operaciones integradas de todas las instalaciones astronómicas de observación nocturna de la NSF a cargo del Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF (NSF’s OIR Lab). Esta nueva organización es el preeminente centro estadounidense para astronomía óptica-infrarroja terrestre, que permite descubrimientos innovadores en astrofísica al desarrollar y operar observatorios terrestres de última generación y proporciona productos de datos y servicios para una comunidad diversa e inclusiva.

Nuevo Director: Patrick McCarthy

La NSF y AURA también tienen el placer de anunciar el nombramiento de Patrick McCarthy como el Director del NSF’s OIR Lab. McCarthy fue hasta hace un tiempo el Vicepresidente del proyecto del Telescopio Gigante de Magallanes y Astrónomo en la Institución Carnegie para la Ciencia. McCarthy se refirió a la nueva organización: “La integración de estas instalaciones en un solo centro de múltiples misiones unifica diversos caminos para la exploración astronómica, facilita la coordinación de la comunidad y permite los descubrimientos del futuro. El centro integrado también estimulará nuevas colaboraciones nacionales e internacionales y proporcionará oportunidades adicionales para el personal, mientras se expanden las capacidades científicas y se mejora la experiencia para los usuarios”.

Más de 60 años de Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja

Desde el año 1958, la NSF ha patrocinado instalaciones de investigación astronómica óptica-infrarroja terrestres en los Estados Unidos y Chile, que son administradas por AURA. El primer sitio creado fue el Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak en Arizona (KPNO), seguido luego por el Observatorio Interamericano Cerro Tololo (CTIO) en Chile. En el año 2000, se iniciaron las operaciones del Observatorio Gemini en Hawái y Chile, financiados por la NSF y un consorcio internacional. La más reciente adición es el Gran Telescopio para Rastreos Sinópticos (LSST), actualmente en construcción en Chile, es un observatorio de última generación patrocinado por la NSF y el Departamento de Energía de los Estados Unidos.

Todas estas instalaciones de la NSF son administradas por AURA pero anteriormente fueron estructuradas como organizaciones separadas. El Observatorio Nacional de Astronomía Óptica (NOAO) operó los telescopios en Kitt Peak y Cerro Tololo y la Ciencia Comunitaria y el Centro de Datos (CSDC). Aparte, AURA primero administró el Observatorio Gemini así como el proyecto de construcción del LSST. El 1 de octubre, los componentes de operaciones de NOAO, Observatorio Gemini y LSST pasaron a ser una sola estructura administrativa, y se dejó de utilizar el nombre NOAO. A medida que LSST termine su construcción, las operaciones aumentadas se convertirán en un componente integral dentro del NSF’s OIR Lab con todas las operaciones comenzando el año 2022.

Programas

Mediante sus cinco programas: Cerro Tololo, CSDC, Gemini, Kitt Peak y LSST, el Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja sirve como un foco de atención para el desarrollo comunitario de innovadores programas científicos, intercambio de ideas y desarrollo creativo. La infraestructura del laboratorio permite que la comunidad astronómica avance en el entendimiento de la humanidad sobre el Universo al explorar áreas significativas de astrofísica, incluyendo energía oscura y materia oscura, galaxias y cuásares, la Vía Láctea, exoplanetas y pequeños cuerpos celestes en nuestro propio Sistema Solar.

“Estamos emocionados de ver que el Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF se convierta en una realidad”, indicó Anne Kinney, la Subdirectora de la NSF para Ciencias Matemáticas y Físicas. “Este nuevo laboratorio nacional reforzará las capacidades patrocinadas por la NSF, que se encuentran a la vanguardia de la investigación astronómica internacional. El nuevo laboratorio de investigación astronómica de la NSF combina una amplia variedad de instalaciones nuevas y existentes en un solo centro multifacético para la investigación astronómica óptica-infrarroja terrestre y desarrollo tecnológico”.

Investigación de Vanguardia

Uno de los cinco programas, LSST, el cual comienza sus mapeos en 2022, revolucionará la astronomía de dominio del tiempo al detectar y reportar 10 millones de eventos astronómicos por noche. El personal de CSDC y colaboradores están creando sistemas de software capaces de filtrar y priorizar la transmisión de alertas del LSST en tiempo real, y los telescopios del NSF’s OIR Lab están desarrollando nuevas capacidades poderosas y dinámicas para una observación con rápida respuesta de seguimiento y análisis de datos.

El Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja también crea nuevas oportunidades en la investigación astronómica con sus extensos archivos de datos al conectar el conjunto de datos de mapeo de imágenes sin precedentes del LSST con conjunto de datos desde, por ejemplo, la Cámara de Energía Oscura (DECam) en el Telescopio Blanco de Cerro Tololo (CTIO) en Chile y el Instrumento Espectroscópico para la Energía Oscura (DESI) en el Telescopio de 4 metros Mayall en el Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak en Arizona. Al coordinar los servicios de la Plataforma de Ciencias del LSST y el Laboratorio de Datos del CSDC, el nuevo laboratorio nacional de la NSF se convertirá en una instalación de ciencia de datos líder en el mundo que proporciona acceso, búsqueda y análisis de estos y otros conjuntos de datos de petaescala.

Las capacidades únicas del Observatorio Gemini de 8.1 metros en ambos hemisferios permiten un seguimiento rápido en telescopios de 8 metros de objetivos identificados por el LSST y otros experimentos de dominio del tiempo. Gemini está mejorando su capacidad existente para responder rápidamente a los objetivos astronómicos de dominio del tiempo y de mensajeros múltiples como parte de un proyecto financiado por la NSF llamado GEMMA [1].

Además de su rol como entrada de la comunidad a las instalaciones y conjunto de datos a través del sistema óptico-infrarrojo, este laboratorio nacional sirve como un foco de atención para coordinar observaciones complementarias utilizando otras técnicas experimentales. Estas capacidades serán fundamentales para la misión astronómica de mensajeros múltiples de la NSF, especialmente en coordinación con las instalaciones de onda gravitacional y de astrofísica de partículas.

Matt Mountain, Presidente de AURA, se refirió al nuevo laboratorio astronómico de la NSF: “Estos son tiempos emocionantes para la astrofísica. Por ejemplo, tanto los descubrimientos de exoplanetas y el ascenso de la astronomía de mensajeros múltiples están liderando la creación a lo largo del mundo de instalaciones de observación incluso más audaces. Al unir el talento y la creatividad de nuestros tres centros existentes: NOAO, Gemini y LSST, hemos creado un nuevo laboratorio de la NSF para responder a estas oportunidades de observación. Esta nueva organización está enfocada en la excelencia científica, técnica y directiva en servicio a nuestra comunidad para permitir la realización de nueva ciencia y avances futuros en astrofísica”.

Notas

[1] GEMMA, una contracción de Gemini en la Era de la Astronomía de Mensajeros Múltiples, está desarrollando nueva instrumentación de óptica adaptativa e infraestructura para acomodar la cantidad de datos esperados del LSST y de otras instalaciones tales como LIGO.

Más Información

Sobre el Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF

El Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF es el centro de los Estados Unidos para la astronomía óptica-infrarroja terrestre. Su misión es permitir descubrimientos innovadores en astronomía óptica-infrarroja terrestre y astrofísica.

El Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación para la Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de la NSF opera el Observatorio Gemini, Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak (KPNO), Observatorio Interamericano Cerro Tololo (CTIO), Ciencia Comunitaria y Centro de Datos (CSDC) y las Operaciones del Gran Telescopio para Rastreos Sinópticos (LSST). Estos son administrados por la Asociación de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía (AURA) bajo acuerdo cooperativo con la NSF, y su Casa Matriz se encuentra en Tucson, Arizona.

La comunidad astronómica tiene el honor de tener la oportunidad de realizar investigación astronómica en Iolkam Du’ag (Kitt Peak) en Arizona, en Mauna Kea en Hawái y en Cerro Tololo y Cerro Pachón en Chile. Estamos conscientes y reconocemos la gran importancia del rol cultural y veneración que estos sitios tienen para la Nación Tohono O’odham, para la comunidad Indígena Hawaiana y para el pueblo indígena de Chile, respectivamente.

Enlaces

Sitio web del laboratorio nacional astronómico

Comunicado de prensa de AURA: https://www.aura-astronomy.org/news/lanzamiento-del-laboratorio-nacional-de-investigacion-para-la-astronomia-optica-infrarroja-de-la-nsf/ 

Contacts

NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory
Lars Lindberg Christensen
Head of Communications, Education & Engagement
Email: lchristensen@aura-astronomy.org
Phone/cell: +49 173 38 72 621

Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy
Shari Lifson
Corporate Communications Coordinator
Email: slifson@aura-astronomy.org
Phone: +1 202 769 5232


Comment/Share

Chat now!
1.64767