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Article ID: 5055

New Scientist Highlights

New Scientist

Highlights of New Scientist for Oct 16, 1997.

Released:
16-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 5052

In Madagascar, Park for People is Born

Wildlife Conservation Society

Madagascar's largest remaining rainforest contanining animals found nowhere else on earth will be preserved, thanks to an historic compromise that blends the two competing pressures faced by poor countries worldwide: conserving natural resources versus human development.

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16-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    16-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 5050

Scientists Solve Active Site of Structure of Enzyme that Produces Nitric Oxide

Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Scientists Solve Active Site of Structure of Enzyme that Produces Nitric Oxide; Discovery Suggests Possible New Ways to Design Novel Drugs for Several Human Diseases

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16-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 5079

Thousands Of Pharmaceutical Advances Mean Medical Care More Efficacious And Less Invasive

American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)

Five thousand of the worldís premier pharmaceutical researchers are gathering in Boston, Nov. 2-6, to discuss the latest scientific research and medical advances of 1997. A small sampling of the breakthroughs, presented for the first time at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting, are listed below.

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15-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 5078

Pharmaceutical Research Mirrors Societies Greatest Health Concerns

American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)

Five thousand researchers gathering in Boston, Massachusetts for the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS), Nov. 2-6, 1997 will present contributed papers responding to societies most chronic medical issues. From cancer to diabetes to asthma, the following top-lines the presented research. Complete abstracts are available by calling Lisa Mozloom or Nicolle Ugarriza at 305-672-4422.

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15-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    15-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 5053

New Clue to Early Neuron Damage in Alzheimer's

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center

NEW YORK, N.Y., Oct. 15, 1997--Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons scientists have discovered a molecule, called ERAB, that provides an important clue to how early neuron damage may occur in Alzheimer's disease. The findings, published in the Oct. 16, issue of Nature, may lead to a intracellular target for the eventual treatment of the disease.

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16-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 5042

Limits of Life on Earth: Are They The Key to Life on Other Planets?

National Science Foundation (NSF)

From scalding hot places that rival Dante's Inferno to frigid locations colder than the dark side of the moon, scientists taking part in a $6 million National Science Foundation (NSF) research initiative are searching for life forms on Earth that may provide insight about possible life on other planets. The first NSF awards in this initiative -- which is titled Life in Extreme Environments (LExEn) -- involve more than 20 research projects and some 40 scientists who will look at life in Earth's most extreme habitats.

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15-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 5041

The Sunspots Are Coming

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Atmospheric scientists participating in a workshop funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) will debate the effects of so-called "space weather" on earth's navigation and communication signals -- two of the major systems affected by an upcoming "solar max." The workshop will take place in Bethesda, Maryland, at COMSAT Corporation, from October 22-24, 1997.

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15-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    13-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 5024

Move over El Nino, a major new climate cycle has been discovered, and it lasts for decades

University of Washington

It looks like El NiÃ’o, it feels like El NiÃ’o, and if you are watching fish stocks or reservoir levels you would say it is El NiÃ’o. But it isn't. Researchers at the University of Washington are describing a decades-long climate shift, called the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, that seems to explain many of the changing environmental patterns seen across North America since the late 1970s, from disappearing salmon along the West Coast to wetter than average winters in the South.

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11-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 5020

NSF Tipsheet -- October 10, 1997

National Science Foundation (NSF)

1) In several science and engineering (S&E) fields, recent Ph.D. recipients have faced unemployment rates unusually high among these highly skilled groups, according to a new National Science Foundation (NSF) Issue Brief. 2) A team of scientists funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) has begun to deploy instruments in a five-year study of a massive plume of muddy water, some 12 miles wide and 200 miles long. 3) "Here lies the true horror of the Himalayas," wrote John Keay in The Gilgit Game. Keay was referring to Nanga Parbat, Urdu for Naked Mountain, a 26,000-foot-high peak on the northernmost edge of the western Himalayas.

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11-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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