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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Aug-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699014

More Workers Working Might Not Get More Work Done, Ants (and Robots) Show

Georgia Institute of Technology

For ants and robots operating in confined spaces like tunnels, having more workers does not necessarily mean getting more work done. Just as too many cooks in a kitchen get in each other’s way, having too many robots in tunnels creates clogs that can bring the work to a grinding halt.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Aug-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698856

The Wheat Code Is Finally Cracked

International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium

The reference sequence of the genome of bread wheat, the world’s most widely cultivated crop, is published, announced the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium.

Released:
13-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Aug-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 698833

Twisted Electronics Open the Door to Tunable 2D Materials

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia University researchers report an advance that may revolutionize the field of 2D materials such as graphene: a “twistronic” device whose characteristics can be varied by simply varying the angle between two different 2D layers placed on top of one another. The device provides unprecedented control over the angular orientation in twisted-layer devices, and enables researchers to study the effects of twist angle on electronic, optical, and mechanical properties in a single device.

Released:
12-Aug-2018 8:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
21-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
16-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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Article ID: 698623

Hubble Paints Picture of the Evolving Universe

Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Astronomers have just assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history, based on a broad spectrum of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and other space and ground-based telescopes. This photo encompasses a sea of approximately 15,000 galaxies — 12,000 of which are star-forming — widely distributed in time and space. Astronomers using the ultraviolet vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have captured one of the largest panoramic views of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe. The field features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are forming stars.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699107

Missouri S&T Chemist Rolls the Dice to Better Identify Chiral Molecules in Drugs

Missouri University of Science and Technology

“High risk, high reward” is the kind of discovery Dr. Garry Grubbs seeks with a new experiment designed to rapidly identify the atomic structure of chiral molecules widely used in pharmaceutical drugs. The finding could significantly reduce the time and costs involved in pharmaceutical development and manufacturing.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699099

Taking a Closer Look at Unevenly Charged Biomolecules

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Clinicians most often monitor antibodies because these small proteins attach to antigens, or foreign substances, we face every day. Most biomolecules, however, have complicated charge characteristics, and the sensor response from conventional carbon nanotube systems can be erratic. A team in Japan recently revealed how these systems work and proposed changes to dramatically improve biomolecule detection. They report their findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699102

Duck Power: Measuring How Much Waterfowl Feel the Burn

University of Delaware

Researchers at the University of Delaware are studying how much energy ducks burn during a given day to study a habitat's carrying capacity. The data can be used to help with conservation efforts, determining if landscapes provide enough habitat to support waterfowl populations at ideal levels.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699103

CSUMB Selected to Host Architecture at Zero Competition in 2019

California State University, Monterey Bay

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the American Institute of Architects, California Council (AIACC) announced the eighth annual Architecture at Zero competition for zero net energy (ZNE) building designs will be held at CSUMB in 2019.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699089

Most Wear-Resistant Metal Alloy in the World Engineered at Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia’s materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It’s 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature’s most wear-resistant materials.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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