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Science

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Alan Wagner, Penn State Aerospace Engineering, autonomous aerial vehicles, Robots, AFOSR, autonomous systems

Penn State Aerospace Engineer Receives AFOSR Funding to Investigate Overtrust with Autonomous Vehicles

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Overtrust frequently occurs with autonomous vehicles and robots—and it can have serious physical, and even fatal, consequences for humans in both the military and society, but Alan Wagner, assistant professor of aerospace engineering at Penn State, is investigating the factors that cause overtrust, and developing techniques that will allow autonomous systems to recognize it and prevent it, thanks to funding from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Science

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Aanem, AANEM Foundation, Clinical Research, Clinical Research Fellowship, Fellowship, Neurology, Neuromuscular, Neurological, Neurotoxins, Research, Science, muscle disorders, Nerve Disorders, Muscle and nerve disorders, Muscle, Nerve

AANEM Foundation Offers Clinical Research Fellowship on the Neurological Application of Neurotoxins

The AANEM Foundation's 1-year fellowship award supports clinical research training to provide insights and answers about the safety and effectiveness of the neurological application of neurotoxins. Apply for the AANEM Foundation's Clinical Research Fellowship any time before March 1, 2018.

Medicine

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Stroke, Ischemic Stroke, tPA, Tpa Treatment, Door to Needle Time, Pharmacists, pharmacists and stroke, RTPA, Tissue Plasminogen Activator, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

Having a Pharmacist at Stroke Patient's Bedside Speeds Administration of Critical Drug

In treating stroke patients, every minute counts. A drug called rtPA sometimes can stop a stroke in its tracks. Now a Loyola Medicine study has found that having a pharmacist at the patient's bedside can reduce the time it takes to administer rtPA by a median of 23.5 minutes.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Time Management

Task Interrupted: A Plan for Returning Helps You Move On

Get interrupted at work much? Making a quick plan for returning to and completing the task you're leaving will help you focus better on the interrupting work, according to new research from the University of Washington.

Medicine

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Allergies, Allergist, Acaai

Want Romance This Valentine's Day? Help Your Sweetie Avoid Allergy and Asthma Triggers

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Romance is the name of the game on Valentine’s Day, and keeping sneezing, wheezing and watery eyes out of the mix helps put everyone more in the mood for love. Here are five tips from ACAAI to help make your Valentine’s Day special.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Social Science, Child Development

A ‘Touching Sight’: How Babies’ Brains Process Touch Builds Foundations for Learning

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A new study from the University of Washington Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) provides one of the first looks inside the infant’s brain to show where the sense of touch is processed — not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult’s hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental and cognitive skills of imitation and empathy.

Business

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Isreal, funding opportunity, First Responder, first responder technology, first responder tech, DHS, S&T, International Partnerships, Grant, Wearable Technology, Sensors, Situational Awareness, Protective Clothing

DHS S&T and Israeli Partners Call for Proposals on Advanced First Responder Technologies

Applications are now being accepted for the NextGen First Responder Technologies solicitation, an opportunity for a maximum conditional grant of up to $1 million, jointly funded by DHS S&T and the Israel Ministry of Public Security (MOPS).

Medicine

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West Nile Encephalitis, West Nile Virus, Memory

Memory Loss From West Nile Virus May Be Preventable

People who survive brain infection with West Nile virus can have neurological problems long after the virus is gone. A new study in mice suggests that such ongoing problems may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. Reducing inflammation with an arthritis drug protected mice from West Nile-induced memory loss.

Medicine

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Melanoma, Cancer, Drug Resistance, Dendritic Cells

Researchers Identify New Way to Unmask Melanoma Cells to the Immune System

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A research team at the Duke Cancer Institute has found a new way to keep the immune system engaged, and is planning to test the approach in a phase 1 clinical trial.

Science

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dinosaur discovery, Theropod, Acrocanthosaurus, Lidar

University of Arkansas Scientists Digitally Preserve Important Arkansas Dinosaur Tracks

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University of Arkansas researchers used LiDAR imaging to digitally preserve and study important dinosaur tracks.







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