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Article ID: 699282

Ecosystems Are Getting Greener in the Arctic

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers from Berkeley Lab have developed a new benchmark model that estimates changes in the proportion of the Earth’s surface where plant growth will no longer be limited by cold temperatures over the 21st century.

Released:
21-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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    21-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 699134

Researchers Unravel the Path of Electrical Discharges on Scales that are Phenomenally Small and Fleetingly Brief, Shedding Light on Future Innovations

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Innovations on the microscale depend on understanding and predicting the behavior of electricity on the smallest of length scales. Scientists already have a good grasp of “electrical breakdown,” when electricity jumps across large gaps and creates plasma. However, researchers have had little insight into the behavior of electricity as it jumps across very small gaps until now. A team reports new research, in the Physics of Plasmas, that shines light on the behavior of electrical breakdown for the smallest gap distances ever studied: a mere 5 to 10 microns.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 699116

Improved Thermal-Shock Resistance in Industrial Ceramics

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Ceramic materials are used in nuclear, chemical and electrical power generation industries because of their ability to withstand extreme environments. However, at high temperatures, ceramics are susceptible to thermal-shock fractures caused by rapid temperature-changing events, such as cold water droplet contact with hot surfaces. In a novel interdisciplinary approach, engineers at the University of New Mexico report in AIP Advances the use of a cheap, simple, water-repelling coating to prevent thermal shock in ceramics.

Released:
16-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699269

Downwind States Stand to Lose if Trump Coal Emissions Plan Takes Shape

Cornell University

Released:
21-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699253

Engineers and Urban Designers Boost Efforts to Protect Fragile Infrastructure

New York Institute of Technology

Researchers at New York Institute of Technology, as part of a multinational consortium to enhance sustainability of the food/energy/water nexus in urban environments, have received a grant from the U.S. National Science Foundation to develop a 3-D data modeling tool known as IN-SOURCE.

Released:
21-Aug-2018 9:25 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699242

Endocrine Society Congratulates Early Investigators Award Winners

Endocrine Society

The Endocrine Society has selected five new recipients for its Early Investigators Awards.

Released:
21-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699266

UGA New Materials Institute to Test First Fully Biodegradable Plastic Straw

University of Georgia

A research team will develop a fully biodegradable plastic straw thanks to an award from Singapore’s Temasek Foundation Ecosperity.

Released:
21-Aug-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699241

Picture This: Camera with No Lens

University of Utah

University of Utah electrical and computer engineers have discovered a way to create an optics-less camera in which a regular pane of glass or any see-through window can become the lens.

Released:
21-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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    21-Aug-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 699216

Dehydration Alters Human Brain Shape and Activity, Slackens Task Performance

Georgia Institute of Technology

Sweating up a storm doing yard work? This is what your brain might be doing: Reasonably customary dehydration led to shape changes in the brains of test subjects in a new study. And neuronal firing patterns got nosier. The subjects' average performance of a motor task also slipped markedly.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Aug-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698308

Nanobot Pumps Destroy Nerve Agents

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Once in the territory of science fiction, “nanobots” are closer than ever to becoming a reality, with possible applications in medicine, manufacturing, robotics and fluidics. Today, scientists report progress in developing the tiny machines: They have made nanobot pumps that destroy nerve agents, while simultaneously administering an antidote.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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