Latest News from: Washington University in St. Louis

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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720345

Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer’s

Washington University in St. Louis

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that microglia drive neurodegeneration in diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, that are linked to tau protein. Targeting microglia may help treat such diseases.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 720407

WashU Expert: Freedom of speech, the NBA and China

Washington University in St. Louis

Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey recently tweeted in support of pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong, causing reaction from the NBA and from China.Following Morey’s tweet, NBA commissioner Adam Silver expressed support for Morey’s freedom of speech. But in response, China’s state broadcaster CCTV punished the NBA by canceling broadcasts of two preseason NBA games.

Released:
8-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 720336

Complex Energies, Quantum Symmetries

Washington University in St. Louis

In a certain sense, physics is the study of the universe’s symmetries. Physicists strive to understand how systems and symmetries change under various transformations.New research from Washington University in St. Louis realizes one of the first parity-time (PT) symmetric  quantum systems, allowing scientists to observe how that kind of symmetry — and the act of breaking of it — leads to previously unexplored phenomena.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Brain Tunes Itself to Criticality, Maximizing Information Processing

Article ID: 720334

Brain Tunes Itself to Criticality, Maximizing Information Processing

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers long wondered how the billions of independent neurons in the brain come together to reliably build a biological machine that easily beats the most advanced computers. All of those tiny interactions appear to be tied to something that guarantees an impressive computational capacity.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 720285

Collagen fibers encourage cell streaming by balancing individual aggression with collective cooperation

Washington University in St. Louis

Engineers from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University have shown that the length of collagen fibers has a roll to play in the ability of normal cells to become invasive.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 720223

Using World of Warcraft to cut gamer screen time, increase maker revenue: study

Washington University in St. Louis

World of Warcraft became the centerpiece of research by scientists from Washington University in St. Louis and INSEAD, who found that when a firm changes its game’s rewards schedule and also limits how long gamers can play in a sitting, the firm can actually make more money — and people devote a smaller share of their time on gaming.

Released:
6-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Scientists Find Timekeepers of Gut’s Immune System
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 720056

Scientists Find Timekeepers of Gut’s Immune System

Washington University in St. Louis

An immune cell that helps set the daily rhythms of the digestive system has been identified by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings open the door to new treatments for digestive ailments targeting such cells.

Released:
2-Oct-2019 3:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 719928

Shape affects performance of micropillars in heat transfer

Washington University in St. Louis

A Washington University in St. Louis researcher has shown for the first time that the shape of a nanostructure has an effect on its ability to retain water.

Released:
1-Oct-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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Newswise: Brave new world: Simple changes in intensity of weather events

Article ID: 719810

Brave new world: Simple changes in intensity of weather events "could be lethal"

Washington University in St. Louis

Hurricane Dorian is the latest example of a frightening trend. Extreme weather events are becoming more frequent, more severe and more widespread as a consequence of climate change. New research from Washington University in St. Louis provides important new insights into how different species may fare under this new normal. Faced with unprecedented change, animals and plants are scrambling to catch up — with mixed results.

Released:
30-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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