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Newswise: UW Research Expands Bilingual Language Program for Babies

UW Research Expands Bilingual Language Program for Babies

University of Washington

A study by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) shows that a bilingual language program for babies can reach more families, and instructors, through online training for teachers.

Channels: Cognition and Learning, Education, Neuro, Family and Parenting, In the Home, Speech & Language, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 11:55 AM EST

Education

Newswise: What's in Puget Sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals

What's in Puget Sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals

University of Washington

Using a new “non-targeted” approach, University of Washington and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present.

Channels: Environmental Science, Food and Water Safety, Marine Science, Pollution, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Community-based counselors help mitigate grief, stress among children orphaned in East Africa

Community-based counselors help mitigate grief, stress among children orphaned in East Africa

University of Washington

A University of Washington-led clinical trial involving more than 600 children in Kenya and Tanzania, in which community members were trained to deliver mental health treatment, showed improvement in participants’ trauma-related symptoms up to a year after receiving therapy.

Channels: Children's Health, Clinical Trials, Mental Health, Psychology and Psychiatry, Trauma, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), African News, Healthcare, JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 12:20 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why

Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why

University of Washington

Scientists have identified the chemical cues in flowers that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell and draw them in. Their findings show how cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — information that could help develop less toxic repellents and better traps.

Channels: Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 1:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Mobile protected areas needed to protect biodiversity in the high seas

University of Washington

In this week's issue of Science, marine scientists make the case for the United Nations to include mobile marine protected areas in the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, or UNCLOS, now being updated since its last signing in 1982.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature, All Journal News,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 7:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off

University of Washington

When nearly one million common murres died at sea and washed ashore from California to Alaska in 2015 and 2016, it was unprecedented — both for murres, and across all bird species worldwide. Scientists from the University of Washington, the U.S. Geological Survey and others blame an unexpected squeeze on the ecosystem's food supply, brought on by a severe and long-lasting marine heat wave known as "the blob."

Channels: Birds, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Wildlife, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 7:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Fisheries management is actually working, global analysis shows

Fisheries management is actually working, global analysis shows

University of Washington

Nearly half of the fish caught worldwide are from stocks that are scientifically monitored and, on average, are increasing in abundance. Effective management appears to be the main reason these stocks are at sustainable levels or successfully rebuilding, according to a new study led by the University of Washington.

Channels: Food Science, Marine Science, Wildlife, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 6:55 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: At gun safety events, 40% of gun owners reported not locking all household guns –– even around kids

At gun safety events, 40% of gun owners reported not locking all household guns –– even around kids

University of Washington

Gun owners will go to events to get free devices for locking up their firearms at home, but a survey of nearly 3,000 participants at such events in Washington found that 40% had unlocked guns at home, and the presence of children in the home did not make a difference.

Channels: All Journal News, Crime and Forensic Science, Government/Law, U.S. Politics,

Released:
10-Jan-2020 3:15 AM EST
Research Results

Law and Public Policy

Newswise: Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus
  • Embargo expired:
    30-Dec-2019 3:00 PM EST

Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus

University of Washington

Life as we know it requires phosphorus, which is scarce. How did the early Earth supply this key ingredient? A University of Washington study, published Dec. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds answers in certain types of carbonate-rich lakes.

Channels: Cell Biology, Chemistry, Geology, All Journal News, Environmental Science, Evolution and Darwin, PNAS, Staff Picks,

Released:
25-Dec-2019 2:00 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Resident Orcas' Appetite Likely Reason for Decline of Big Chinook Salmon
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Dec-2019 3:00 PM EST

Resident Orcas' Appetite Likely Reason for Decline of Big Chinook Salmon

University of Washington

Large, old Chinook salmon have mostly disappeared from the West Coast. A new University of Washington and NOAA study points to the recent rise of resident killer whales, and their insatiable appetite for large Chinook salmon, as the main driver behind the decline of the big fish.

Channels: All Journal News, Marine Science, Nature, Environmental Science, Wildlife, Staff Picks,

Released:
12-Dec-2019 2:05 PM EST
Research Results


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