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Newswise: Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST

Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor

The Rockefeller University Press

The biological actions of insulin are mediated by its receptor—the insulin receptor—which is localized on the cell surface. In a new study, researchers from Germany, Canada, and Finland show how insulin interacts with its receptor at a second binding site. The scientists hope that these new details concerning insulin–receptor interactions will ultimately expand the current models of insulin binding to its receptor and pave the way towards new approaches to structure-based drug design.

Channels: All Journal News, Cell Biology, Diabetes, Grant Funded News,

Released:
7-Nov-2019 12:00 PM EST
Newswise: David Eisner Named Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)

David Eisner Named Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)

The Rockefeller University Press

David Eisner has been selected to serve as the eighth editor-in-chief of the Journal of General Physiology (JGP), effective January 1, 2020. Eisner, the British Heart Foundation Professor of Cardiac Physiology at the University of Manchester, succeeds Sharona Gordon, who has led the journal since 2014.

Channels: Heart Disease, Psychology and Psychiatry,

Released:
22-Oct-2019 12:30 PM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes a severe lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung’s airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach to treating IPF.

Channels: Cell Biology, Genetics, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Journal of Experimental Medicine, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
7-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Announcement
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Cancer cells turn to cannibalism to survive chemotherapy, study suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Tulane University School of Medicine have discovered that some cancer cells survive chemotherapy by eating their neighboring tumor cells. The study, which will be published September 17 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that this act of cannibalism provides these cancer cells with the energy they need to stay alive and initiate tumor relapse after the course of treatment is completed.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Cell Biology, Women's Health, Grant Funded News,

Released:
10-Sep-2019 10:00 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother’s immune response, study suggests
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Aug-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother’s immune response, study suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

New research led by scientists at The Rockefeller University in New York may help explain why Zika virus infection causes birth defects in some children but not others. The study, which will be published August 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that the risk of developing an abnormally small head (microcephaly) depends on the types of antibody produced by pregnant mothers in response to Zika infection.

Channels: All Journal News, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, OBGYN, Women's Health, Zika Virus, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Grant Funded News,

Released:
7-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study, which will be published June 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body’s immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway could prevent the deaths of patients suffering rapid liver failure in response to viral infection.

Channels: All Journal News, Genetics, Liver Disease, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Grant Funded News,

Released:
12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease. The study, which will be published June 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this human protein, known as CXCR4, could be a way to block the parasite’s life cycle and prevent the development of malaria.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Grant Funded News,

Released:
5-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC
  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC

The Rockefeller University Press

Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study, which will be published May 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their rapid growth and altering their susceptibility to immunotherapy.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Immunology, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Grant Funded News,

Released:
22-May-2019 9:25 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals
  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Pharmaceuticals, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Grant Funded News,

Released:
13-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer
  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in New York have found that treating human prostate cancer cells with a drug that targets a protein called PHLPP2 may prevent the cancer cells from spreading to other organs in the body. The study, which will be published May 15 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that inhibiting PHLPP2 lowered the levels of MYC, an oncogenic protein that causes many different types of cancer that cannot be targeted by conventional drug therapies.

Channels: Cancer, Cell Biology, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
8-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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