Latest News from: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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Newswise: Improving Indoor Air Quality During Wildfires

Improving Indoor Air Quality During Wildfires

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A Q&A with Berkeley Lab indoor air scientists on protecting homes, schools, and other buildings, from air pollution during wildfires.

Channels: All Journal News, Environmental Health, In the Home, Pollution, Public Health, Wildfires, DOE Science News,

Released:
25-Oct-2019 4:15 PM EDT
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Newswise: Using Faster Computing to Better Predict Earthquake Damage to Infrastructure
Released:
18-Oct-2019 2:55 PM EDT
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Newswise: Tiny Toxins: How Algal Blooms Affect Coastal Systems Through a Complex Web of Interactions

Tiny Toxins: How Algal Blooms Affect Coastal Systems Through a Complex Web of Interactions

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A Q&A with scientist Michelle Newcomer on looking for unexpected causes of harmful algal blooms. Harmful and nuisance algal blooms are thought to have a number of contributing causal factors, including a build-up of nutrients, unusually high water temperatures, and extreme weather events such as floods and drought. But an understanding of the connectivity between these triggers is missing, as is an ability to predict the onset of the blooms.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, DOE Science News,

Released:
28-Aug-2019 10:30 AM EDT
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Newswise: Moving Forward on Desalination

Moving Forward on Desalination

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A Q&A with scientist Jeff Urban, who explains forward osmosis and how Berkeley Lab is pushing the frontiers of this emerging technology

Channels: Agriculture, All Journal News, Chemistry, DOE Science News,

Released:
31-Jul-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Newswise: How Drought and Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution

How Drought and Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

One in 10 Americans depends on the Colorado River for bathing and drinking. Last fall’s record-high temperatures reduced Colorado snowpack in winter 2018 to 66 percent of normal, sparking concern over water shortages downstream and leaving water managers fearful of a repeat. Berkeley Lab hydrological science expert Bhavna Arora explains how unseasonably warm weather and drought can affect water quality.

Channels: Food and Water Safety, Drought, DOE Science News, Local - California,

Released:
10-Oct-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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