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Newswise: Cranial deformation as an indicator for cultural membership

Article ID: 717853

Cranial deformation as an indicator for cultural membership

University of Vienna

Led by Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna, Austria and Mario Novak from the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagreb, Croatia the study combines bioarchaeological isotopic and ancient DNA methods to analyze the dietary patterns, sex, and genetic affinities of three Migration Period (5th century CE) individuals who were recovered from a pit in the city of Osijek in eastern Croatia. They are associated with the presence of various nomadic people such as the Huns and/or Germanic tribes like the Gepids and Ostrogoths in this part of Europe. The results of the study are published in the recent issue of "PLOS ONE".

Released:
22-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Quantum gravity’s tangled time

Article ID: 717852

Quantum gravity’s tangled time

University of Vienna

The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, recently an international team of researchers led by physicists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences as well as the University of Queensland (AUS) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (USA) have combined the key elements of the two theories describing the flow of time and discovered that temporal order between events can exhibit genuine quantum features.

Released:
22-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Former NNSA Administrator Linton Brook Wins Foster Medal for National Security Work

Article ID: 717839

Former NNSA Administrator Linton Brook Wins Foster Medal for National Security Work

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Linton Brooks, ambassador for arms control, administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration and a nuclear submarine officer, has been named the fifth recipient of the John S. Foster Medal for his life’s work in advancing U.S. national security and international cooperation for a more secure world.

Released:
22-Aug-2019 6:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Project Begins to Hire and Retain More Women, Minority STEM Faculty

Article ID: 717847

Project Begins to Hire and Retain More Women, Minority STEM Faculty

Wichita State University

Wichita State University continues to make strides toward improving opportunities for women in senior leadership, with women currently holding six out of 10 dean positions throughout the university. Now WSU is taking an even bigger step to increase the number of women – and minorities – among its faculty with a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

Released:
22-Aug-2019 4:05 AM EDT

Education

  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2019 4:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 717646

WHO Releases First Report on Microplastics in Drinking-Water

World Health Organization (WHO)

Every day we are ingesting tiny, often microscopic pieces of plastic known as "microplastics" with our food, beverages and the air we breathe. The new Microplastics in Drinking-water report examines the evidence, key findings, recommendations and research needs. It is the first effort to examine the potential human health risks associated with exposure to microplastics in the environment. (Virtual Press Conference Details)

Released:
19-Aug-2019 12:15 PM EDT

Article ID: 717803

Researchers Discover Cause of Asthmatic Lung Spasms

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Researchers at Rutgers and other institutions have discovered how muscle contraction (bronchospasm) in the airway, which cause breathing difficulty in people with asthma, occur by creating a microdevice that mimics the behavior of the human airways. The study, published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, could lead to new treatment strategies for respiratory diseases, said co-author Reynold Panettieri, director of the Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science.

Released:
22-Aug-2019 2:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2019 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717719

CBD Products, Hemp Oil May Be Helpful but More Research Is Needed, Mayo Clinic Review Says

Mayo Clinic

Cannabidiol (CBD) oils and products have become increasingly popular with consumers as ways to find relief from aches and pains, anxiety, sleep disturbances and other chronic issues. But are these products safe, and are they helpful?

Released:
20-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2019 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717645

Mayo Clinic Study Calls for Screening of Family Members of Celiac Disease Patients

Mayo Clinic

Parents, siblings and children of people with celiac disease are at high risk of also having the disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study. This study calls for screening of all first-degree relatives of patients — not just those who show symptoms.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Newswise: Heart and Lung Surgery Patients May Be at High Risk for Opioid Dependence
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Aug-2019 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717594

Heart and Lung Surgery Patients May Be at High Risk for Opioid Dependence

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

The amount of opioids prescribed for patients after heart and lung surgery has a direct relationship with the risk for opioid dependency and “persistent opioid use” several months after the operation.

Released:
16-Aug-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 717851

Super-powered immune cells – leading the next cancer breakthrough

University of South Australia

Ground-breaking immune therapy promises to deliver vital evidence in the fight against cancer as researchers from the Centre for Cancer Biology open a new clinical trial using genetically engineered immune cells to treat solid cancers.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 11:05 PM EDT

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