Latest News

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
newswise-fb-share-
Newswise: Most Rehabilitating Sea Turtles with Infectious Tumors Don’t Survive

Most Rehabilitating Sea Turtles with Infectious Tumors Don’t Survive

Florida Atlantic University

Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles’ eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern U.S. from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75 percent did not survive following admission into a rehabilitation facility, irrespective of whether or not tumor regrowth occurred after surgery.

Channels: All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Marine Science, Nature, Veterinary Medicine, Wildlife,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:30 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Comment
Newswise: UND Aerospace and Petroleum Engineering teaming up to study whether aviation safety concepts can be applied to offshore drilling

UND Aerospace and Petroleum Engineering teaming up to study whether aviation safety concepts can be applied to offshore drilling

University of North Dakota

“Better safe than sorry” is an overused credo in life. But in the world of aviation and oil-and-gas exploration, as much as anywhere, it can be the fine line between life and death. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine recognizes this sobering reality and is betting that proven successes in one of those industries – aviation—can be applied to the other, specifically on offshore drilling rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. And the Academies has turned to the University of North Dakota, which has expertise in both disciplines, for what could be a first-of-a-kind such study.

Channels: Aviation and Aeronautics, Engineering, In the Workplace,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:20 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Comment
Research Results

Law and Public Policy

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published “Viewpoint” articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans’ ability to regulate body temperature.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Staff Picks,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Comment
Feature

Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses

Cornell University

Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate.

Channels: Agriculture, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Food Science, Genetics, Plants,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 10:15 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Research Results

The color of your clothing can impact wildlife

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Your choice of clothing could affect the behavioral habits of wildlife around you, according to a study conducted by a team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Channels: Behavioral Science, Environmental Science, Nature, Wildlife,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 9:40 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Comment
Research Results
Newswise: Meet Liguo Wang, Scientific Operations Director of LBMS

Meet Liguo Wang, Scientific Operations Director of LBMS

Brookhaven National Laboratory

This spring, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory will open its new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) center, the Laboratory for BioMolecular Structure (LBMS). A state-of-the-art research center for life sciences imaging, LBMS will offer two advanced cryo-electron microscopes for studying complex proteins, as well as the architecture of cells and tissues.

Channels: Cell Biology, DOE Science News, Energy,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Comment
Expert Pitch
Newswise: Mapping the Path of Climate Change

Mapping the Path of Climate Change

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Predicting a major transition, such as climate change, is extremely difficult, but the probabilistic framework developed by the authors is the first step in identifying the path between a shift in two environmental states.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Physics, Staff Picks,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Comment
Feature
ACS-logo.png
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers have identified a protein in foxtail millet that can help stave off atherosclerosis in mice genetically prone to the disease. They report their results in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Channels: Agriculture, Food Science, Health Food, Nutrition, All Journal News,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST
Open in New Tab
Research Results


0.54901