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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

High Air Pollution Exposure in One-Year-Olds Linked to Structural Brain Changes at Age 12

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

A new study suggests that significant early childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is associated with structural changes in the brain at the age of 12. The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center study found that children with higher levels of TRAP exposure at birth had reductions at age 12 in gray matter volume and cortical thickness as compared to children with lower levels of exposure.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Cognition and Learning, Environmental Health, Neuro, Pollution, PLOS ONE,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 1:25 PM EST
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28-Jan-2020 12:05 AM EST
Released to reporters:
24-Jan-2020 1:20 PM EST

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New coronavirus could lead to pandemic

University of Georgia

With news that the coronavirus called 2019-nCoV is capable of spreading from human to human, many are concerned about the possibility of a new pandemic, and that is not outside the realm of possibility, according to Jeff Hogan, a professor and infectious disease expert at the University of Georgia, who studied the SARS coronavirus extensively.

Channels: All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, China News, Southeast Asia News,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 1:10 PM EST
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Opioid Dependence Found to Permanently Change Brains of Rats

University of California San Diego Health

Approximately one-quarter of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them, with five to 10 percent developing an opioid use disorder or addiction. In a new study, UC San Diego researchers found that opioid dependence produced permanent changes in the brains of rats.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Mental Health, Neuro, Pain, Psychology and Psychiatry, Substance Abuse, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), PNAS, Staff Picks,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 1:05 PM EST
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University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center treats its first glioblastoma patient with genetically modified poliovirus

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center treated its first patient in a new clinical trial to validate the groundbreaking effects of the poliovirus on glioblastoma (GBM), a deadly Grade IV cancer of the brain. UH is the only Midwest site participating in this clinical trial, which was initiated at Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, NC. The original study, which ran from 2012-2017, was published in New England Journal of Medicine in July 2018 as well as highlighted on “60 Minutes” in 2015 and again in 2018. The study found that survival rates were significantly higher in glioblastoma patients who received an intratumoral infusion of a modified viral chimera combining the polio and rhinoviruses (PVSRIPO immunotherapy) compared to patients receiving standard treatment at the same institution.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Healthcare, Immunology, Neuro, Surgery, NEJM,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
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Advanced Practice Registered Nurses to Have a Greater Role in National Response to Opioid Epidemic

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

As we enter a new year and a new decade, many states have enacted legislation affecting the roles of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in terms of practice authority, reimbursement, and prescriptive authority, according to the 32nd Annual Legislative Update in the January issue of The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Government/Law, Healthcare, Nursing, Pain, Patient Safety, Substance Abuse,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 12:45 PM EST
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Law and Public Policy

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Media alert: The Allied Genetics Conference (TAGC) 2020

Genetics Society of America

Reporters are invited to attend The Allied Genetics Conference (TAGC), to be held April 22-26, 2020 in National Harbor, Maryland, just 30 minutes from downtown Washington DC. TAGC 2020 will feature the latest discoveries from researchers at the leading edge of what is possible in the biological and biomedical sciences.

Channels: Aging, Cancer, Cell Biology, Evolution and Darwin, Genetics,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 12:20 PM EST
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Newswise: Disarming bacteria with mucus and phages

Disarming bacteria with mucus and phages

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Millions of people are treated with antibiotics each year for infections or as a preventative measure. Two teams of NIBIB-funded scientists have been working to find alternative solutions for treating bacterial infections, especially antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Infectious Diseases, Nature (journal), Grant Funded News,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 12:15 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Family Caregivers Are Rarely Asked About Needing Assistance With Caring for Older Adults

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Family caregivers usually are not asked by health care workers about needing support in managing older adults’ care, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: Aging, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Family and Parenting, Healthcare, National Institute on Aging (NIA), JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 1:30 PM EST
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