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Project adapts basic tech to give voice to patients in Africa

Cornell University

A new system developed by Cornell Tech researchers will allow thousands of patients of community health care workers in rural Africa to use a basic tool on their mobile phones – one that doesn’t even require an internet connection – to provide feedback on their care anonymously, easily and inexpensively.

Channels: All Journal News, Healthcare, Technology, African News,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 3:25 PM EST
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Einstein Receives $178 Million in NIH Funding in Fiscal Year 2019, Largest Annual Total in Institution’s History

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine secured $178 million from the National Institutes of Health in federal fiscal year 2019, marking the largest annual total in the institution’s history (excluding supplemental stimulus funding distributed as a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009). Major grants included those to lead international consortiums to study Ebola and HIV, as well as those focusing on neuroscience, genetics, and improving health among minority groups.

Channels: All Journal News, In the Workplace, Grant Funded News, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
10-Dec-2019 3:05 PM EST
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Children Much More Likely to Die After Surgery in Poor Countries

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Children in low resourced countries are 100-200 times more likely to die after surgery than children in wealthy countries, according to a first-of-its-kind study published in Anesthesiology.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Healthcare, Poverty, Surgery, African News,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 2:55 PM EST
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Newswise: Intermittent fasting shown to provide broad range of health benefits in new Texas State study

Intermittent fasting shown to provide broad range of health benefits in new Texas State study

Texas State University

Intermittent fasting may provide significant health benefits, including improved cardiometabolic health, improved blood chemistry and reduced risk for diabetes, new research conducted in part at Texas State University indicates.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Diabetes, Health Food, Nutrition,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 2:45 PM EST
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'Ojos' study to examine eye disease in Latino communities

University of Illinois at Chicago

With $9.7 million in funding from the National Eye Institute, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago will study the impact of chronic eye disease among Latinos.

Channels: All Journal News, Race and Ethnicity, Vision, Grant Funded News, National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), South America News,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 2:10 PM EST
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Newswise: Training Developed by Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Professor to Assess Intimate-Partner Violence Risk Now Offered to All Veterans Administration Clinical Staff
Released:
10-Dec-2019 1:20 PM EST
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Newswise: Baylor University Researcher Develops Questionnaire to Aid Patients in Adhering to Vital Medical Treatment Plans

Baylor University Researcher Develops Questionnaire to Aid Patients in Adhering to Vital Medical Treatment Plans

Baylor University

Effectiveness in preventing or treating serious medical conditions typically requires patients to follow treatment plans such as medication, exercise or diet, but about 50 percent of patients fail to adequately use those plans. A Baylor University psychology professor has developed a questionnaire for patients aimed at promoting treatment adherence and improved health.

Channels: All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Healthcare, Psychology and Psychiatry,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 1:15 PM EST
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New insights into the effect of aging on cardiovascular disease

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Aging adults are more likely to have – and die from – cardiovascular disease than their younger counterparts. New basic science research finds reason to link biological aging to the development of narrowed, hardened arteries, independent of other risk factors like high cholesterol.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 1:05 PM EST
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12-Dec-2019 8:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
10-Dec-2019 1:00 PM EST

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