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Medical reporting symposium to bring leading journalists to UNC-CH

University of North Carolina Health Care System

Some of the nation's leading medical reporters will speak at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Nov. 14-15 in a symposium for working medical journalists and medical communications specialists.

Released:
6-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    6-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Diabetes explains higher heart death rates for recipients of angioplasty

American Heart Association (AHA)

A long-term study shows that individuals whose coronary arteries are obstructed and who are treated with angioplasty have more heart-related deaths than those who undergo bypass surgery.

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2-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Protein linked to "popped" aneurysms

American Heart Association (AHA)

A chemical version of a "balloon-popper" has been identified that may help explain why some aortic aneurysms rupture and others do not. The report appears in today's American Heart Association journal Circulation.

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2-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Blood-thinning drug may improve clot-busting treatment, save lives

American Heart Association (AHA)

For treating heart attacks, the blood thinner hirulog is better than heparin when added to a "clot-buster" to dissolve blood clots and reopen clogged arteries, according to a report in today's American Heart Association journal Circulation.

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2-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    5-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Epilepsy Research Advance Reported at Jackson Laboratory

Jackson Laboratory

Researchers at The Jackson Laboratory report in Cell the development of the first genetic model to exhibit both absence and convulsive epileptic seizures. The "slow wave epilepsy" (swe) mouse promises to be the most authentic model yet for petit mal epilepsy in humans.

Released:
3-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Researchers discover new target for obesity drugs

Stanford University School of Medicine

Using clues from a fat, yellow mouse, researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of Michigan have identified a new cog in the body's main weight-regulating system. The protein they discovered may join leptin, a protein identified in 1994, as a prime target for the development of drugs to fight obesity, said Dr. Gregory Barsh, an associate professor of pediatrics and genetics at Stanford and the senior author of the study.

Released:
4-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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October 1997 Tips from the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center

University of Missouri School of Medicine

Tips from the University of Missouri Health Sciences Center for October 1997: 1)Taking a new shot at allergic reactions; 2)MU docs make headway against "brain attack"; 3) New ulcer test easier to stomach; 4) Two Bs make for a healthier heart. 10/3/97

Released:
4-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    4-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Specialist In Tissue Engineering To Address National Academy Of Engineering Session October 8

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One of the countryís leading specialists in the science of human tissue engineering, Dr. Gail Naughton, president and CEO, Advanced Tissue Sciences, Inc., will review recent developments in human tissue creation, including advances in skin replacement technology for burn victims and the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at the National Academy of Engineeringís Symposium on Bioengineering. Dr. Naughton also will discuss future technologies in this area, such as the development of cartilage from single human cells and the creation of cardiovascular tissue and other internal organs.

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4-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Dental Office of the Future To Feature Patient-Friendly Technology

American Dental Association (ADA)

WASHINGTON -- Imagine having a computer disk with your entire dental health history, including pictures of your teeth during various stages of your life and voice recordings of your dentist's treatment recommendations.

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3-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Gum Grafting Provides New Smile Options

American Dental Association (ADA)

-- Tooth whitening may be the most popular cosmetic dental procedure, but more and more patients are discovering a great way to improve their smile by sculpting their gums

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3-Oct-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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