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Computer models of the heart can help cure cardiac ills

Johns Hopkins University

A computer model developed by a Johns Hopkins biomedical engineer mimics the way a heart works, down to the sub-cellular level, and can be used to mathematically "test" drugs for various heart disorders.

Released:
26-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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No Link Between Race and Body's Response to Heart Attack

Henry Ford Health System

In four separate studies, researchers from Henry Ford Hospital's Heart & Vascular Institute found no link between race and a patient's physiological response to a heart attack. These findings indicate there is no need to factor race into decisions regarding medical treatment after a heart attack.

Released:
26-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Couch Potatoes, Not French Fries, May Be To Blame For Obesity

Purdue University

A comparison of data on fast-food consumption and rising obesity has found a surprising wrinkle: There doesn't appear to be much of a link, at least in terms of large populations.

Released:
25-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Goverment Releases Latest Report on the Nation's Health

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS, CDC)

Injuries continue to have a major impact on the health of Americans, according to the latest federal government report on the nation's health, issued today by HHS Secretary Donna E. Shalala.

Released:
25-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    24-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Gene Therapy in Mice Delays Onset of Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center

Scientists studying mice genetically engineered to develop familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, have found that the human gene Bcl-2 may delay the onset of ALS. The study appears in the July 24 issue of Science.

Released:
25-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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AAFP Congratulates Clinton Administration on Increase in Childhood Immunization

American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) today congratulated President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton on their efforts to immunize America's children, noting the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's new data indicating that 90 percent or more of America's toddlers received the most critical doses of each of the recommended vaccines in 1996.

Released:
24-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Known tumor suppressor gene may play a role in breast cancer

University of California, Santa Cruz

A gene linked to the most common abdominal cancer in children also may contribute to the development of breast cancer, according to a study at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Oregon Health Sciences University.

Released:
23-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Stanford University Medical Center Health Tips -- July 1997

Stanford University School of Medicine

Topics: Picking a sunscreen is easy if you follow some simple rules; Don't be shy about telling your eye care professional what to look for when you get glasses; Weight training in kids requires special precautions; Beware of once exotic bugs that can now pop up in your food supply.

Released:
22-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Researcher closer to understanding why some people do not contract farmer's lung

University of Iowa

IOWA CITY, Iowa -- Repeated exposure to molds often found in damp hay and grain can irritate the lungs causing a disease known as farmer's lung or hypersensitivity pneumonitis. The syndrome causes coughing and shortness of breath, and is "reasonably common in the Midwest," says Dr. Gary Hunninghake, University of Iowa professor of internal medicine, who has studied the disease for many years.

Released:
22-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    22-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Innovative Procedure to Fix Birth Defects in Newborns

Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital researchers have achieved the first successful repair, in animals, of congenital anomalies by combining the emerging technologies of video-guided fetal surgery and the engineering of a scarce commodity--live replacement tissue.

Released:
18-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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