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    2-Sep-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Burning out tissue cuts need for "shocking" racing heart by implanted defibrillator

American Heart Association (AHA)

Burning out damaged heart tissue through a procedure called ablation sharply reduces the number of shocks delivered by implantable defibrillator to slow down racing hearts, a new study reports in today's American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Released:
27-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    31-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Annals of Internal Medicine TipSheet

American College of Physicians (ACP)

Tips from Annals of Internal Medicine (American College of Physicians): 1) Does ethnicity play a part in disease? 2) No evidence found linking blood transfusions and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma 3) Advances in cardiology over the past year

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3-Sep-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Sheep Protein May Prevent HIV Infection in Newborns

Texas A&M Health Science Center

Early treatment with a protein that normally signals pregnancy in sheep may block the development of AIDS in babies born to HIV-infected mothers, say researchers at Texas AUM University's Institute of Biosciences and Technology.

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31-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Teens Not Being Tested For HIV

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Despite concerns about contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), many adolescents still arent being tested for HIV, according to a recent study published in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Released:
30-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Most Children Not Meeting Food Guidelines

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Most children are eating below the minimum recommendations for food group intake, with many not meeting any of the recommendations, according to a study in the September issue of Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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30-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Mayo Clinic News Briefs

Mayo Clinic

1) A two-drug combination significantly reduced infections and disease among a group of liver transplant patients. 2) Rapamycin is a new drug that holds great promise for fight organ rejection in transplant patients and tumors in cancer patients. 3) Headaches are usually not serious. But they can be ominous signs of major problems.

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30-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Camera and E-mail Cut Costs of Catching Early Eye Disease

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers are establishing a screening service that uses an automated camera to identify diabetics with a potentially blinding eye disease long before they sustain permanent damage and lose vision.

Released:
29-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Denatl Tips From Columbia University School Of Dental And Oral Surgery

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center

Story ideas from the Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery's Guide to family Dental Care: 1) The Daily Grind, 2) Reducing The Neurosis About Halitosis, 3) Preparing Your Child For A Dental Visit

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29-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Mayo Plans Follow-up Fen-Phen Study

Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is coordinating a new, multi-center study that will use advanced imaging techniques to determine whether taking appetite suppressants including fenfluramine-phentermine (fen-phen), dexfenfluramine (Redux) and/or other appetite suppressants is associated with the development of valvular heart disease. Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, which markets the appetite suppressants Pondimin (fenfluramine) and Redux, will fund this study.

Released:
29-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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    28-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Gay Male Youth Seven Times More Likely to report Suicide Attempts than Heterosexual Peers

University of Minnesota

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found young gay men are seven times more likely to report attempted suicide than their heterosexual peers, but suicide attempts were unrelated to sexual orientation in young women.

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29-Aug-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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