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LagarVelho1-uCTteeth.jpg

Article ID: 560005

Ongoing Evolution Among Modern Humans: the View from the Teeth

Washington University in St. Louis

An international team of researchers, including Erik Trinkaus, professor of Anthropology at Washington University in Saint Louis, has reanalyzed the complete immature dentition of a 30,000 year-old-child from the Abrigo do Lagar Velho, Portugal. The new analysis of the Lagar Velho child shows that these “early modern humans” were “modern” without being “fully modern.”

Released:
4-Jan-2010 5:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 559966

Top Ten Evolution/Creationism Stories of the Year

National Center for Science Education

Darwin celebrated; evolution still under attack. The Year in Review.

Released:
31-Dec-2009 2:20 PM EST
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Article ID: 559928

1st Molars Provide Insight Into Evolution of Great Apes, Humans

Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The timing of molar emergence and its relation to growth and reproduction in apes is being reported by scientists at Arizona State University’s Institute of Human Origins. “We can use the same techniques to calculate ages at first molar emergence from the fossils of early hominids that just happened to die while their first molars were erupting,” they say.

Released:
28-Dec-2009 7:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 559882

Birds Provide Clues in How Humans Learn Speech

University of Chicago

Research on communication in animals helps understand of how language develops in humans and how they use it. Language is a phenomenon of evolutionary biology.

Released:
22-Dec-2009 9:00 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

mudsnail.jpg

Article ID: 559802

Sex and the Single Snail: Study Shows Benefits of Sexual Reproduction Over Asexual

University of Virginia

A new study provides credence to the understanding that asexual reproduction allows for the ongoing accumulation and replication of harmful mutations, leaving less room for adaptation to rapidly changing environments.

Released:
18-Dec-2009 11:35 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Dec-2009 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 559582

Darwin Updated: Scientists Suggest Certain Genes Boost Chances for Distributing Wide Variety of Random Traits, Drive Evolution

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Genes that don’t themselves directly affect the inherited characteristics of an organism but leave them increasingly open to variation may be a significant driving force of evolution, say two Johns Hopkins scientists.

Released:
11-Dec-2009 7:00 PM EST
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Noturus_stigmosus.jpg

Article ID: 559535

Killer Catfish? Venomous Species Surprisingly Common

University of Michigan

Name all the venomous animals you can think of and you probably come up with snakes, spiders, bees, wasps and perhaps poisonous frogs. But catfish?

Released:
10-Dec-2009 8:00 PM EST
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hippidion33.jpg

Article ID: 559494

DNA Study Sheds New Light on Horse Evolution

University of Adelaide

Ancient DNA retrieved from extinct horse species from around the world has challenged one of the textbook examples of evolution – the fossil record of the horse family Equidae over the past 55 million years.

Released:
10-Dec-2009 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Dec-2009 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 559415

Female Birds – Acting Just Like the Guys – Become Sexual Show Offs in Cooperative Breeding Species

Cornell University

Female birds in species that breed in groups can find themselves under pressure to sexually show off and evolve the same kinds of embellishments – like fanciful tail feathers or chest-puffing courtship dances - as males, according to new research in the latest issue of Nature (Dec. 10, 2009).

Released:
8-Dec-2009 12:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 559372

NCSE Changes Web/Email Domain

National Center for Science Education

NCSE is shifting its primary domain to ncse.com.

Released:
7-Dec-2009 2:30 PM EST
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