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Paleontology

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Paleontology, Evolution, Fossil, chimaeras, Sharks, South Africa

280 Million-Year-Old Fossil Reveals Origins of Chimaeroid Fishes

High-definition CT scans of the fossilized skull of a 280 million-year-old fish reveal the origin of chimaeras, a group of cartilaginous fish related to sharks. Analysis of the brain case of Dwykaselachus oosthuizeni, a shark-like fossil from South Africa, shows telltale structures of the brain, major cranial nerves, nostrils and inner ear belonging to modern-day chimaeras.

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Research on Dinosaur Embryos Reveals That Eggs Took 3 to 6 Months to Hatch

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New research on the teeth of fossilized dinosaur embryos indicates that the eggs of non-avian dinosaurs took a long time to hatch--between about three and six months.

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Evolution, Histology, Paleontology, Biology, aerobic capacity, Dinosaurs, archosaurs, Mammals, mammals and birds, Birds, Fossils

Biologists Follow ‘Fossilizable’ Clues to Pinpoint When Mammal, Bird and Dinosaur Ancestors Became Athletes

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The study is the first to draw a link between RBC size and microscopic traces of blood vessels and bone cells inside bones. They found that extinct mammal and bird relatives had smaller RBCs and were likely better athletes than earlier terrestrial vertebrates. The timing of RBC-size reduction coincided with Earth's greatest mass extinction 252 mya.

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New Prehistoric Bird Species Discovered

A team of geologists at the University of Rochester has discovered a new species of bird in the Canadian Arctic. At approximately 90 million years old, the bird fossils are among the oldest avian records found in the northernmost latitude, and offer further evidence of an intense warming event during the late Cretaceous period.

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Amber Specimen Offers Rare Glimpse of Feathered Dinosaur Tail

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Researchers from China, Canada, and the University of Bristol have discovered a dinosaur tail complete with its feathers trapped in a piece of amber.

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Dinosaur, dinosaur growth, dinosaur discovery, Geoscience, Science, Research, Virginia Tech, Fralin Life Science Institute, global change center

Virginia Tech Geoscientists Size-Up Early Dinosaurs, Find Surprising Variation

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The study focused on the skeletal changes that occurred during growth in the small carnivorous dinosaur Coelophysis (SEE-lo-FY-sis), one of the earliest dinosaurs.

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, lightsource, TED Talks, Science, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, X-ray science, X-ray imaging

‘Brighter Than A Billion Suns’: SLAC Studies Featured in TEDx Talk

Phil Manning and his colleagues have used synchrotron light for nearly a decade to help interpret the chemical signatures locked within fossilized life. Bright X-rays have allowed them to study fossilized worm burrows, recreate pigment patterns in ancient bird feathers, see how Jurassic dinosaur bones heal and image the living chemistry of 50-million year old plant fossils.

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Salamanders, Endangered Species, new species

Three New Species of Miniaturized Tropical Salamanders Are Already Endangered

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Researchers working in Mexico have discovered and named 3 new species of the enigmatic genus Thorius. With adults smaller than a matchstick, these salamanders are the smallest tailed tetrapods and are already endangered.

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Greenland Fossils Help Show Recovery After Mass Extinction Event 252 Million Years Ago

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A new study published in Scientific Reports shows how higher latitude ecosystems recovered after the World's most cataclysmic extinction event 252 million years ago.

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Herbivorous Mammals Have Bigger Bellies

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What do enormous dinosaurs have in common with tiny shrews? They are both four-legged vertebrates, otherwise known as tetrapods. In the course of evolution, tetrapods developed various body shapes and sizes - from the mouse to the dinosaur - to adapt to different environments. Their feeding habits range from pure herbivory to fierce carnivory, and their body structure reflects this feeding diversity. As plants are usually more difficult to digest than meat, herbivores are thought to need larger guts and more voluminous bellies. Nevertheless, this hypothesis had never been tested scientifically.







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