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Science

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Dinosaur, dinosaur growth, dinosaur discovery, Geoscience, Science, Research, Virginia Tech, Fralin Life Science Institute, global change center

Virginia Tech Geoscientists Size-Up Early Dinosaurs, Find Surprising Variation

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The study focused on the skeletal changes that occurred during growth in the small carnivorous dinosaur Coelophysis (SEE-lo-FY-sis), one of the earliest dinosaurs.

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, lightsource, TED Talks, Science, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, X-ray science, X-ray imaging

‘Brighter Than A Billion Suns’: SLAC Studies Featured in TEDx Talk

Phil Manning and his colleagues have used synchrotron light for nearly a decade to help interpret the chemical signatures locked within fossilized life. Bright X-rays have allowed them to study fossilized worm burrows, recreate pigment patterns in ancient bird feathers, see how Jurassic dinosaur bones heal and image the living chemistry of 50-million year old plant fossils.

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Salamanders, Endangered Species, new species

Three New Species of Miniaturized Tropical Salamanders Are Already Endangered

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Researchers working in Mexico have discovered and named 3 new species of the enigmatic genus Thorius. With adults smaller than a matchstick, these salamanders are the smallest tailed tetrapods and are already endangered.

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Greenland Fossils Help Show Recovery After Mass Extinction Event 252 Million Years Ago

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A new study published in Scientific Reports shows how higher latitude ecosystems recovered after the World's most cataclysmic extinction event 252 million years ago.

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Herbivorous Mammals Have Bigger Bellies

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What do enormous dinosaurs have in common with tiny shrews? They are both four-legged vertebrates, otherwise known as tetrapods. In the course of evolution, tetrapods developed various body shapes and sizes - from the mouse to the dinosaur - to adapt to different environments. Their feeding habits range from pure herbivory to fierce carnivory, and their body structure reflects this feeding diversity. As plants are usually more difficult to digest than meat, herbivores are thought to need larger guts and more voluminous bellies. Nevertheless, this hypothesis had never been tested scientifically.

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Paleolithic, Caves, Lions, Upper Paleolithic, Hunt

Upper Paleolithic Humans May Have Hunted Cave Lions for Their Pelts

Upper Paleolithic humans may have hunted cave lions for their pelts, perhaps contributing to their extinction, according to a study published October 26, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marián Cueto from the Universidad de Cantabria, Spain, and colleagues.

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Study Finds Earliest Evidence in Fossil Record for Right-Handedness

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Teeth striations of Homo habilis fossil date back 1.8 million years.

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Ancient Fish Illuminates One of the Mysteries of Childhood

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Remember dropping your milk teeth? After a lot of wiggling the tooth finally dropped out. But in your hand was only the enamel-covered crown: the entire root of the tooth had somehow disappeared.

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Morgan Schaller, Global Warming, Science, Impact, Comet, tektites, PETM, Rensselaer, Columbia

Extraterrestrial Impact Preceded Ancient Global Warming Event

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A comet strike may have triggered the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a rapid warming of the Earth caused by an accumulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide 56 million years ago, which offers analogs to global warming today.

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beardog, Dog, Canine, BEAR, Polar Bear, ursus, Fossils, Evolution, Genetics, DNA, Ct Scan, Evolutionary Biology, Animals, Animal Behavior

From Unknown to Beardog: Findings Rescue Fossils From “Trashbin” Genus

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A new study identifies two fossils previously thought to be generic carnivorans (a large, diverse order of mammals) as some of the earliest known members of the beardog family. These fossils are from animals estimated to be no larger than about five pounds, roughly the size of a Chihuahua and much smaller than formidable descendants that would later evolve.







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