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Environmental Health

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Science

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Biology, fish, Contaminants, Wastewater, Pharmaceuticals, Metabolism, Sewage

Pharmaceuticals and Other Emerging Contaminants Force Fish to Work Harder to Survive

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Pharmaceuticals and other man-made contaminants are forcing fish that live downstream from a typical sewage treatment plant to work at least 30 per cent harder just to survive, McMaster researchers have found.

Science

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Wake Forest University, Wake Forest, WFU, CINCIA, Pope Francis, Madre de Dios, Environmental, Environment, Amazon, Rain Forest, Gold mining, Puerto Maldonado, Luis Fernandez, Miles Silman, Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation

Scientists Study Mercury Poisoning in Peruvian Forest on Pope’s Itinerary

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Pope Francis’ visit to Peru on Jan. 15-22 takes him to the epicenter of the country’s informal and often illegal gold mining industry – the subject of groundbreaking environmental research by Wake Forest University scientists.

Medicine

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Arsenic Exposure, Water Contamination, Diabetes, Insulin Secretion, Physiology

Arsenic-Tainted Drinking Water May Increase Diabetes Risk

A new study reports that chronic exposure to arsenic interferes with insulin secretion in the pancreas, which may increase the risk of diabetes.

Science

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Algae, Algae blooms, Water Quality, Iowa State University, lakes and rivers

New EPA Grant to Predict, Combat Harmful Algal Blooms in Iowa Lakes

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A new grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will allow ISU scientists to develop new tools to predict and combat harmful algal blooms, a growing threat to human and animal health in Iowa’s lakes. Cyanobacteria, which have the ability to produce toxic byproducts, can grow quickly and form blooms that discolor lake water, typically in warm, shallow surface water during the summer months.

Science

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Uniformed Services University, Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, USU, Usuhs, Rhodotorula, Rhodotorula taiwanesis, radioactive waste, Bioremediation, Genome Sequencing, Yeast

Yeast May Be the Solution to Toxic Waste Clean-Up

About 46,000 nuclear weapons were produced during the Cold War era, leading to tremendous volumes of acidic radioactive liquid waste seeping into the environment. A new study suggests yeast as a potentially safer and more cost effective way to help clean up these radioactive waste sites. The study, “Prospects for Fungal Bioremediation of Acidic Radioactive Waste Sites: Characterization and Genome Sequence of Rhodotorula taiwanensis MD1149,” was published in Frontiers in Microbiology, Jan. 8.

Medicine

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Genetic Changes Help Mosquitoes Survive Pesticide Attacks

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UCR study shows how intensive pesticide use is driving mosquito evolution at the genetic level

Science

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Xylella: A Conscience, Not a Science Problem

The Sbarro Health Research Organization congratulates the Italian researchers who were able to prove a direct causal link between the infection by Xylella fastidiosa and the death of olive trees in southern Italy.

Medicine

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Ecology, Environment, Molecular Biology, Toxicology, Biotechnology, Molecular Mapping, Pharmaceutical Science, Metabolomics, Forensics, Agriculture, 3d modeling

Molecular Mapping Made Easy

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Every day, every inch of skin on your body comes into contact with thousands of molecules — from food, cosmetics, sweat, the microbes that call your skin home. Now researchers can create interactive 3D maps that show where each molecule lingers on your body, thanks to a new method developed by University of California San Diego and European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) researchers.

Medicine

Science

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National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences, Niehs, Lifespan, environmental stressors, Fruit Flies, theory of aging, Mthl10, Growth-block peptide (GBP), Inflammation, Cell-surface protein, Signaling protein

Defending Against Environmental Stressors May Shorten Lifespan

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A shorter life may be the price an organism pays for coping with the natural assaults of daily living, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues in Japan. The scientists used fruit flies to examine the relationship between lifespan and signaling proteins that defend the body against environmental stressors, such as bacterial infections and cold temperatures. Since flies and mammals share some of the same molecular pathways, the work may demonstrate how the environment affects longevity in humans.

Science

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SUNY Downstate’s Dr. Laura Geer Available to Discuss FDA Rule on OTC Antiseptic Soaps







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