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Environmental Health

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Science

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air pollution and health, Commuting

Crank the AC, Cut in-Car Pollution

For many, the commute to and from work is a lengthy, stressful process. According to the U.S.  Census Bureau, it takes the average American about 26½ minutes to get to work. That’s nearly an hour each day — to work and back — to face traffic snarls and congested highways. That commute can also be hazardous to your health, exposing drivers to an increased amount of air pollutants that have been linked to a whole host of medical maladies, including cardiovascular disease, respiratory issues and even lung cancer.

Medicine

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Endocrinology, Reproduction, Lactation, Antimicrobial exposure, triclocarban

Exposure to Antimicrobials During Development May Cause Irreversible Outcomes

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have discovered that exposure to environmental levels of triclocarban (TCC), an antibacterial chemical common in personal care products like soaps and lotions as well as in the medical field, can transfer from mother to offspring and interfere with lipid metabolism.

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Extreme Heat Linked to Climate Change May Adversely Affect Pregnancy

A systematic review links extreme heat exposure to changes in gestation length, birth weight, stillbirth and neonatal stress

Medicine

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Business

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World Governments Make Citizens Pay Billions to Destroy Their Own Health

The Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) has launched the report Hidden Price Tags: How ending fossil fuel subsidies would benefit our health providing the first-ever comparison of fossil fuel subsidies and the costs to health associated with air pollution from fossil fuels.

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Giant Weedkiller Bottle Torn Down as Europe Debates Future of Glyphosate

Citizens toppled a giant glyphosate bottle at the Schuman roundabout outside the European Commission to symbolise the demand of over 1.3 million people across Europe calling for a ban of the controversial weedkiller.

Medicine

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Pollution, Preterm Birth, preterm babies, Low Birth Weight, Pregnancy

Preterm Birth and Low Birth Weight Linked to Air Pollution Exposure Early in Pregnancy, Study Finds

The study, conducted in mice, found that exposure to air pollution during the equivalent of the first or second trimester in humans was linked to more negative birth outcomes than exposure later in pregnancy.

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A Step Closer to Halting the Spread of Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya

Upstate Medical University researcher Anna Stewart Ibarra, Ph.D., M.P.A., and her colleagues have created a mathematical model that can serve as a guide to make monthly predictions on when people are at greatest risk for contracting mosquito-borne viruses, such as dengue, Zika and chikungunya, due to climate conditions.

Medicine

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Biology, Microbiology, Environment, Great Lakes Research, Public Health, Harmful Algal Blooms, Fertilizers, Agriculture

New Robotic Lab Tracking Toxicity of Lake Erie Algal Bloom

A new research tool to safeguard drinking water is now keeping a watchful eye on Lake Erie. This week, a robotic lake-bottom laboratory began tracking the levels of dangerous toxins produced by cyanobacteria that bloom each summer in the lake's western basin.

Medicine

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Asthma, Epigenetics, Transgenerational Health Risks, Dna Methylation, Gene Expression, Environmental Pollution, Prenatal Health, Pregnancy, Offspring Health

Environmental Pollution Exposure During Pregnancy Increases Asthma Risk for Three Generations

Exposure to environmental pollutants during pregnancy may increase the risk of asthma for as many as three consecutive generations, according to new research.

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Mercury, international conference on mercury, ICMGP 2017

Researchers from Biodiversity Research Institute to Present at the 2017 International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant

Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) will participate in several capacities at the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant (ICMGP), to be held at the Rhode Island Convention Center July 16-21, 2017. The ICMGP is committed to better understanding and effectively managing mercury releases and emissions to decrease human and wildlife exposure. This biennial conference brings together a diversity of participants from around the globe. The theme of this year's conference is Integrating Mercury Research and Policy in a Changing World. BRI wildlife research biologists will present current mercury research in presentations and poster sessions. BRI will also host an exhibit booth (#30) in the Exhibit Hall throughout the Conference.







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