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Evolution and Darwin

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Science

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Nature Communications, Flowers, Evolution, flowering plants, Charles Darwin, an abominable mystery, Juerg Schoenenberger, Hervé Sauquet, earliest flowers, revonstruction

What Flowers Looked Like 100 Million Years Ago

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Flowering plants with at least 300,000 species are by far the most diverse group of plants on Earth. They include almost all the species used by people for food, medicine, and many other purposes. However, flowering plants arose only about 140 million years ago, quite late in the evolution of plants, toward the end of the age of the dinosaurs, but since then have diversified spectacularly. No one knows exactly how this happened, and the origin and early evolution of flowering plants and especially their flowers still remains one of the biggest enigmas in biology, almost 140 years after Charles Darwin called their rapid rise in the Cretaceous "an abominable mystery". A new study, coordinated by Juerg Schoenenberger from the University of Vienna and Hervé Sauquet of the Université Paris-Sud and published in "Nature Communications" reconstructs the evolution of flowers and sheds new light on what the earliest flowers might have looked like.

Medicine

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cancer evolution, james degregori, mutations cancer, theory cancer, theory evolution cancer, university of colorado cancer center

Refuting the Idea That Mutations Cause Cancer

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Writing today in the journal Cancer Research, James DeGregori, PhD, deputy director of the University of Colorado Cancer Center offers evidence that it is forces of evolution driven by natural selection acting in the ecosystem of the body that, in the presence of tissue damage, allow cells with dangerous mutations to thrive.

Science

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Saliva, Molecular Biology, Evolution Biology, Hominids, Protein, MUC7, Sub-Saharan Africa, Neanderthal, Denisovan, homo erectus, oral microbiome

In Saliva, Clues to a ‘Ghost’ Species of Ancient Human

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In saliva, scientists have found hints that a “ghost” species of archaic humans may have contributed genetic material to ancestors of people living in Sub-Saharan Africa today. The research adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting that sexual rendezvous between different archaic human species may not have been unusual.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Archaeology, Australia, Anthropology

Artifacts Suggest Humans Arrived in Australia Earlier Than Thought

A team of researchers, including a faculty member and seven students from the University of Washington, has found and dated artifacts in northern Australia that indicate humans arrived there about 65,000 years ago — more than 10,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Science

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Dogs, Reseach, Animals

Study Reveals Origin of Modern Dog Has a Single Geographic Origin

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By analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolution in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University, has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding, to be published in Nature Communications, suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population of gray wolves that occurred between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Kansas State, fish, Evolution, Biology, Sexual Selection, Michael Tobler, Tobler

A Tale of Two Fishes: Biologists Find Male, Female Live-Bearing Fish Evolve Differently

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A Kansas State University study has found that male and female live-bearing fish evolve differently: Female evolution is influenced more strongly by natural selection, while male evolution is influenced more strongly by sexual selection.

Science

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Amphibian, Amphibians, Pesticide, Pesticides, Tolerance, pesticide tolerance, Parasites, Biology, Agriculture, animal biology, amphibian populations, animal populations, Stress, wood frogs, Frogs, Evolution, trematode, ranavirus, Pathogen, Ecology, freshwater biology, Biological Science, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Bing

Amphibians Can Become Tolerant to Pesticides, but at a Cost

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Amphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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New Analysis of Rare Argentinian Rat Unlocks Origin of the Largest Mammalian Genome

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New biological information gleaned from the red vizcacha rat, a native species of Argentina, demonstrates how genomes can rapidly change in size. Researchers from McMaster University set out to study this particular species because its genome, or its complete set of DNA, is the largest of all mammals, and appears to have increased in size very rapidly.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Archaeology, phenomenology, GIS techology, Chaco Canyon , Pueblo Bonito, Sound, landscape studies, Hearing

Archaeologists Put Sound Back Into a Previously Silent Past

Many attempts to explain how past people experienced their wider world have focused on sight at the expense of sound, but researchers from the University at Albany and the University at Buffalo have developed a tool that puts sound back into the ancient landscape.

Science

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Paleontology, Evolution Biology, Crocodilians, T. rex, Madagascar, Jurassic

Gigantic Crocodile with T. Rex Teeth Was a Top Land Predator of the Jurassic in Madagascar

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Little is known about the origin and early evolution of the Notosuchia, hitherto unknown in the Jurassic period. New research on fossils from Madagascar, published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ by Italian and French paleontologists, begin to fill the gap in a million-year-long ghost lineage.







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