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Volcanoes, Pollutants, Great Lakes, Microbes, subseafloor life

Media Tip Sheet: URI Research to Be Presented at International Earth Science Meeting, Dec. 15-19

Research on underwater volcanoes, Great Lakes pollution, subseafloor life and much more will be among the 40 projects that will be presented by scientists from the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography at the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting in San Francisco from Dec. 15 to 19.

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Geology, Geoscience, Volcano, Laguna del Maule, Chile, Magma, Molten, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geochronology, seismic waves

UW Team Explores Large, Restless Volcanic Field in Chile

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For seven years, an area larger than the city of Madison has been rising by 10 inches per year. That rapid rise provides a major scientific opportunity: to explore a mega-volcano before it erupts. That effort, and the hazard posed by the restless magma reservoir beneath Laguna del Maule, are described in a major research article in the December issue of GSA Today.

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MARS, Planetary Geoscience, Volcano, volcanic gases , Water, Weizmann Institute Of Science

How Water Could Have Flowed on Mars

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The surface of Mars clearly shows what looks like evidence of flowing water: riverbeds, deltas, and the like. But these signs have been a puzzle – until now. The Weizmann Institute’s Dr. Itay Halevy and Brown University’s Dr. James Head III have identified a possible source: violent eruptions from massive volcanoes that periodically melted Mars’ ice.

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Cascades, Cascade Range, Mount Rainier, Volcanism, Volcanoes, Magma, Subduction, Plates, SLAB, Plumbing, Magma chamber

New View of Mount Rainier's Volcanic Plumbing

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By measuring how fast Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, a University of Utah researcher and colleagues made a detailed picture of Mount Rainier’s deep volcanic plumbing and partly molten rock that will erupt again someday.

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Volcano, Magma, Mount St. Helens, Eruption, Earthquake, Seismic

Scientists Ready to Study Magma Formation Beneath Mount St. Helens

University and government scientists are embarking on a collaborative research expedition to improve volcanic eruption forecasting by learning more about how a deep-underground feeder system creates and supplies magma to Mount St. Helens.

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Volcano, Volcanic, Indonesia, Ecuador, Simon Carn, sinabung, Tungurahua, Volcanology

The Science Behind Volcanoes in Indonesia, & Ecuador

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Science

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Volcanology, Volcanoes, sinabung, popocatepetl, Vesuvius

UB Volcanologists Can Discuss Safety and Hazards Surrounding High-Risk Volcanoes in Populated Areas

Science

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Volcano, Antarctica, seismic analysis, seismic imaging

Volcano Discovered Smoldering Under a Kilometer of Ice in West Antarctica

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A temporary seismic array in Marie Byrd Land in West Antarctica recorded two bursts of activity in 2010 and 2011. Careful analysis of the events shows they originate from a subglacial volcano at the leading end of a volcanic mountain chain. The volcano is unlikely to erupt through the kilometer of ice that covers it but it will melt enough ice to change the way the ice in its vicinity flows.

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Volcanoes, Volcanology, Geology, Earth Science, Oceans, Planetary Science

Water and Lava, but — Curiously — No Explosion

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A study finds that hollow, land-based lava pillars in Iceland likely formed in a surprising reaction where lava met water without an explosion. Such formations are common deep under the ocean, but have not been described on land, the lead researcher says.

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Volcanoes, Magma, Eruption, Yellowstone

Molten Magma Can Survive in Upper Crust for Hundreds of Millennia

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Reservoirs of silica-rich magma – the kind that causes the most explosive volcanic eruptions – can persist in Earth's upper crust for hundreds of thousands of years without triggering an eruption, according to new University of Washington research.







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