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Science

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Palaeontology, Sea Life, Ecosystem

Lost Ecosystem Found Buried in Mud of Southern California Coastal Waters

Paleontologists Adam Tomašových of the Slovak Academy of Sciences and Susan Kidwell of the University of Chicago examine a lost ecosystem of scallops and shelled marine organisms called brachiopods in a new study.

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UNLV Human Paleontology Expert Available to Discuss Discovery of 300,000 Year Old Human Remains

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Paleontology, Dinosaur

How the Famous Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Bone Bed Came to Be

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The Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Since its discovery in the 1920s, numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of the quarry. Were the dinosaurs poisoned? Did they die due to drought? Were they trapped in quick sand? A new study suggests that the quarry represents numerous mortality events which brought the dinosaurs to the site over time, rather than a single fatal event.

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Life on Terra Firma Began with an Invasion

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Scientists are now confident animal life on solid ground started with a few short bursts of marine creatures making the leap from the oceans. New research at the University of Portsmouth also paints a clear picture of how animals rapidly spread out and changed once they made the leap.

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Paleontology, Precambrian, Ediacaran Period, computational fluid dynamics, Parvancorina

Life in the Precambrian May Have Been Much Livelier Than Previously Thought

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An interdisciplinary study suggests that the strange creatures which lived in the Garden of the Ediacaran more than 540 million years ago before animals came on the scene may have been much more dynamic than experts have thought.

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Tyrannasaurus Rex, dinosaur physiology

The Secrets Behind T-Rex’s Bone Crushing Bites: Researchers Find T-Rex Could Crush 8,000 Pounds

A Florida State- Oklahoma State research team found that T. rex could pulverize bones, chomping down with nearly 8,000 pounds of force.

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Regeneration, Macrophage, Tissue Regeneration, African spiny mouse, Immune Cells, scar tissue, University Of Kentucky, human regenerative medicine

UK Researchers Identify Macrophages as Key Factor for Regeneration in Mammals

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The team’s findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how immune cells might be harnessed to someday help stimulate tissue regeneration in humans.

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Fossils, Argentina, Flowers, Cornell University, History, Cretaceous Period, Paleocene epoch

Oldest Buckthorn Fossilized Flowers Found in Argentina

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Around 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, a giant asteroid crashed into the present-day Gulf of Mexico, leading to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. How plants were affected is less understood, but fossil records show that ferns were the first plants to recover many thousands of years afterward. Now, a team including Cornell researchers reports the discovery of the first fossilized flowers from South America, and perhaps the entire Southern Hemisphere, following the extinction event

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dinosaur discovery, Dinosaur, new species, sauropod

New Dinosaur Species Increases the Diversity of the 'Whiplash Dinosaurs'

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New sauropod species is named Galeamopus pabsti by the same team which recently reinstated the brontosaurus as a distinct genus.

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Megafauna, Extinction, Ancient Dna, Ice Age, Evolution, Climate Change

Megafaunal Extinctions Driven by Too Much Moisture

Studies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. The persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting populations of large herbivore grazers.







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