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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jan-2018 7:05 PM EST

Article ID: 688314

Researchers Pose Revolutionary Theory on Horse Evolution

New York Institute of Technology

Scientists have long wondered how the horse evolved from an ancestor with five toes to the animal we know today. While it is largely believed that horses simply evolved with fewer digits, researchers at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) pose a new theory that suggests remnants of all five toes are still present within the hooves of the horse.

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23-Jan-2018 11:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688239

Meet “Alesi,” a 13-Million-Year-Old Ancestor, at Rutgers Geology Museum This Weekend

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

About 13 million years ago, a distant ancestor of modern apes and humans suffered an untimely death on the arid landscape of northern Kenya. Last year, a Rutgers scientist helped bring its tiny skull to light, filling in a huge gap in the evolutionary record. And on Saturday, members of the public are invited to come face-to-skull with that ancestor, known as “Alesi,” at the Rutgers Geology Museum’s 50th annual Open House event. The museum stands on the College Avenue Campus of Rutgers University–New Brunswick. Admission is free.

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22-Jan-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688166

A Survival Lesson From Bats – Eating Variety Keeps Species Multiplying

Stony Brook University

A new study reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more new species in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species.

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18-Jan-2018 4:40 PM EST
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Article ID: 687558

What Species Is Most Fit for Life? All Have an Equal Chance, Scientists Say

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them — from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria — has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper published Jan. 8 in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, scientists describe the dynamic that began with the origin of life on Earth 4 billion years ago.

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8-Jan-2018 3:15 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 687431

‘Hide or Get Eaten,’ Urine Chemicals Tell Mud Crabs

Georgia Institute of Technology

Mud crabs hide for their lives if blue crabs, which prey upon them, pee anywhere near them. Pinpointing urine compounds for the first time that warn the mud crabs of predatory peril initiates a new level of understanding of how chemicals invisibly regulate undersea wildlife and ecosystems.

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3-Jan-2018 3:40 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Jan-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687552

Chemists Discover Plausible Recipe for Early Life on Earth

Scripps Research Institute

Following the chemistry, scientists develop fascinating new theory for how life on Earth may have begun.

Released:
5-Jan-2018 5:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jan-2018 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687274

Leaping Larvae: Developing Flies Jump Without Legs

Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)

New research characterizes jumping behavior in larval midge flies. Even though these larvae are typically restrained during development, they can use a unique physiological mechanism to jump long distances. These results will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA.

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27-Dec-2017 4:25 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jan-2018 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687277

When a Bad Thing Becomes Good: Was Inflammation Modified to Become Implantation in Placental Mammals?

Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)

New research shows that inflammation was modified by uterine decidual cells to facilitate implantation in placental mammals. The results of this study will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA on January 5, 2018.

Released:
27-Dec-2017 4:50 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Jan-2018 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 687275

The Secret World of Dinosaur Tracks

Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB)

Scans of fossilized dinosaur prints show how some dinosaur feet moved not just on top of but through the earth. The results of this study will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA on January 4, 2018

Released:
27-Dec-2017 4:40 PM EST
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Article ID: 687359

Study Reveals How the Midshipman Fish Sustains Its Hour-Long Mating Call

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered how the Pacific midshipman fish can hum continuously for up to an hour in order to attract potential mates. The study, which is featured on the cover of the January 2018 issue of the Journal of General Physiology, explains how the muscle fibers surrounding the fish’s swimbladder can sustain the high rates of contraction—up to 100 times per second—that are needed to produce the animal’s distinctive call.

Released:
2-Jan-2018 1:15 PM EST
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