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Evolution and Darwin

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Science

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Biology, Evolution, Species, Reproduction, Ecology, Animals, Evolutionary Biology, Zoology

Promiscuous Salamander Uses Genes From Three Partners Equally

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A UI study shows that a unique all-female lineage of salamander equally balances genes from the males of three other salamander species. The findings highlight the bizarre ways some animals reproduce in order to preserve their species. The results were published in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution.

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UNLV Human Paleontology Expert Available to Discuss Discovery of 300,000 Year Old Human Remains

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Biology, Science, Tree Of Life, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Darwin, On the Origins of Species, Microbes, Microbiology, Microbial, Bacteria, Plants, Animals, symbiomes, Systematics, SymPhy , Ecosystems, Environment, Technology, Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Jersey, NJ, Debashish Bhattacharya

Reshaping Darwin’s Tree of Life

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In 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his trailblazing book on the theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species. Now, scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and their collaborators want to reshape Darwin’s tree.

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Discovery in Morocco Points to Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils

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An international research team has uncovered 300,000 year-old fossil bones of Homo sapiens, a find that represents the oldest reliably dated fossil evidence of our species.

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Squirrel, Mammals, Biodiversity, new species, Species

Hiding in Plain Sight: New Species of Flying Squirrel Discovered

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A new study published May 30 in the Journal of Mammalogy describes a newly discovered third species of flying squirrel in North America — now known as Humboldt's flying squirrel. It inhabits the Pacific Coast region of North America, from southern British Columbia to the mountains of southern California.

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Paleontology, Dinosaur

How the Famous Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Bone Bed Came to Be

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The Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry is the densest collection of Jurassic dinosaur fossils. Since its discovery in the 1920s, numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of the quarry. Were the dinosaurs poisoned? Did they die due to drought? Were they trapped in quick sand? A new study suggests that the quarry represents numerous mortality events which brought the dinosaurs to the site over time, rather than a single fatal event.

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Evolution, Genetic Changes, genetic variants, Genetic Mutations, Limb Development, Cilia, bone development, Galapagos Islands, Charles Darwin, skeletal ciliopathies

How the Galapagos Cormorant Lost Its Ability to Fly

UCLA scientists discovered that changes to the genes that shortened the Galapagos cormorant's wings are the same genes that go awry in a group of human bone disorders characterized by stunted arms and legs. The findings shed light on the genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of limb size and could eventually lead to new treatments for people with skeletal ciliopathies.

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Brain, neural circuit, Connectivity, Evolution, Behavior, Rewire, sea slugs, Akira Sakurai, Paul Katz, giant nudibranch , hooded nudibranch

Georgia State Neuroscientists Rewire Brain of One Species to Have Connectivity of Another

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Scientists at Georgia State University have rewired the neural circuit of one species and given it the connections of another species to test a hypothesis about the evolution of neural circuits and behavior.

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Human Evolution, Evolution, Biology, Science, Water, Groundwater, Springs, Early Humans, Africa, East Africa, Hominins, Climate, Climate Change, East African Rift Valley, East African Rift, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Geology, Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Jersey, NJ

Springs Were Critical Water Sources for Early Humans in East Africa, Rutgers Study Finds

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About 1 to 2 million years ago, early humans in East Africa periodically faced very dry conditions, with little or no water in sight. But they likely had access to hundreds of springs that lingered despite long dry spells, allowing our ancestors to head north and out of Africa, according to a groundbreaking study by scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other institutions. The international team showed that climate may not play such a primary role in human evolution as is commonly asserted.

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Biology, Biodiveristy, Genetics, Evolution

Genetic Analysis of New World Birds Confirms Untested Evolutionary Assumption

Biologists have always been fascinated by the diversity and changeability of life on Earth and have attempted to answer a fundamental question: How do new species originate?







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