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Article ID: 695690

FSU Experts Available to Discuss Accelerating Rates of Sea Level Rise

Florida State University

Released:
6-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695647

Nanotechnology for Plant Nutrition

American Technion Society

Technion researchers have found they can significantly increase agricultural yields, by using nanoscale delivery platforms that until now were used to transport drugs to specific targets in a patient's body. The technology increases the penetration rate of nutrients into the plant, from 1% to approximately 33%.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695648

Surprising Recovery of Red Spruce Shows Value of Clean Air Act

University of Vermont

Surprising new research shows that red spruce are making a comeback—and that a combination of reduced pollution mandated by the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act and changing climate are behind the resurgence.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695645

Exploring Greener Approaches to Nitrogen Fixation

Brookhaven National Laboratory

Brookhaven Lab chemists and other experts in nitrogen research have identified several potential routes for transforming nitrogen that are more environmentally and energy-friendly than today’s chemical processes.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 3:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695617

Biodiversity Research Institute Announces Critical Findings From 5-Year Restore the Call Loon Research Study

Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI)

Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) announces results of its five-year loon study Restore the Call: a male loon chick that was translocated in 2015 from the Adirondack Park Region of New York to the Assawompsett Pond Complex (APC) in southeastern Massachusetts has returned to the APC lake from which it fledged. The identification of this loon (through color bands) marks the first confirmed account of an adult loon returning to the lake to which it was translocated, captive-reared, and then fledged.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695615

UCI Scientists Analyze First Direct Images of Dissolved Organic Carbon From the Ocean

University of California, Irvine

In a first, researchers from the University of California, Irvine – as well as Switzerland’s University of Zurich, IBM Research-Zurich and UC Santa Cruz – have obtained direct images of dissolved organic carbon molecules from the ocean, allowing better analysis and characterization of compounds that play an important role in the Earth’s changing climate.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695607

UNH Researchers Shine a Light on More Accurate Way to Estimate Climate Change

University of New Hampshire

All plants take up carbon dioxide during photosynthesis. During this changeover, the plants emit an energy “glow” that is not visible to the human eye, but can be detected by satellites in space. Now, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have taken that one step further. By using satellite data from different major land-based ecosystems around the globe, they have found that the photosynthesis glow is the same across all vegetation, no matter the location. This first-of-its-kind global analysis could have significance in providing more accurate data for scientists working to model carbon cycle and eventually help better project climate change.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 10:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695581

Ancient Greenland Was Much Warmer Than Previously Thought

Northwestern University

Just beyond the northwest edge of the vast Greenland Ice Sheet, Northwestern University researchers have discovered lake mud that beat tough odds by surviving the last ice age. The mud, and remains of common flies nestled within it, record two interglacial periods in northwest Greenland. Although researchers have long known these two periods — the early Holocene and Last Interglacial — experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in the Earth’s orbit, the mix of fly species preserved from these times shows that Greenland was even warmer than previously thought.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 4:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695580

Expert: Deadly Guatemalan Eruption Highlights Dangers, Differences in Volcanic Activity

West Virginia University

Released:
4-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695570

Study Suggests Earth Could Have Supported Continental Crust, Life Earlier Than Thought

University of Chicago

The early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research from a group led by University of Chicago scientists.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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