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Science

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Global Warming, Climate Change, Geology

New Approach to Geoengineering Simulations Is Significant Step Forward

Using a sophisticated computer model, scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a new research approach to geoengineering could potentially be used to limit Earth’s warming to a specific target while reducing some of the risks and concerns identified in past studies, including uneven cooling of the globe.

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New Approach to Geoengineering Simulations Is Significant Step Forward

Using a sophisticated computer model, scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a new research approach to geoengineering could potentially be used to limit Earth’s warming to a specific target while reducing some of the risks and concerns identified in past studies, including uneven cooling of the globe.

Science

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Sustainability, Climate Change, Marine animals, Whales, Ocean, Biology

Climate Change, Sparse Policies Endanger Right Whale Population

North Atlantic right whales – a highly endangered species making modest population gains in the past decade – may be imperiled by warming waters and insufficient international protection, according to a new Cornell University analysis published in Global Change Biology.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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paris agreement, Climate Change, COP23, Syria

Notre Dame Expert Available to Discuss COP23, Syria & Paris Agreement

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Science

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Ecology, Climate Change, Wildflowers, Pollinators, Evolution, Ecological Changes

How Climate Change May Reshape Subalpine Wildflower Communities

An unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals.

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Butterflies, Insects, Genetics, Evolution, Mimicry

How a “Flipped” Gene Helped Butterflies Evolve Mimicry

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Scientists from the University of Chicago analyzed genetic data from a group of swallowtail species to find out when and how mimicry first evolved, and what has been driving those changes since then.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Urban Planning, Infrastructure, floodplain, Flooding, Environmental Science, Stormwater, green industry, transit-oriented development, Project Management, Renewal, Chicago suburbs, Robbins, IL

Grant to Assist Robbins Renewal Project

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Backed by funding from the Searle Funds at The Chicago Community Trust, the University of Illinois at Chicago will join a partnership between the village of Robbins and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) to support the Southwest suburb's revitalization and sustainability efforts.

Science

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Climate Change, Environmental Justice, earth and planetary sciences, Temperature, Poverty, Global Warming, climate change and human health

Climate Change Likely to be More Deadly in Poor African Settlements

Conditions in crowded urban settlements in Africa make the effects of climate change worse, pushing temperatures to levels dangerous for children and the elderly in those areas.

Science

Business

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WINE, winemakers, wildfire damage, Wildfire, Impact, Economic Impact, wine business, Education, Higher Ed, hands-on learning

How Will the Nor Cal Wildfires Affect California’s Wine Industry?

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Experts at Fresno State and Sonoma State are still assessing the impact of the recent fires. So far, winemakers at both campuses see a healthy picture for the state and wine lovers alike.

Science

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Extinction, Ecology, Evolution, Conservation

Caribbean Islands Reveal a “Lost World” of Ancient Mammals

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A new study by an international team of scientists reports an analysis of the incredibly diverse “lost world” of Caribbean fossils that includes dozens of ancient mammals. The study reveals that the arrival of humans throughout the islands was likely the primary cause of the extinction of native mammal species there.







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