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Science

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Tyrannasaurus Rex, dinosaur physiology

The Secrets Behind T-Rex’s Bone Crushing Bites: Researchers Find T-Rex Could Crush 8,000 Pounds

A Florida State- Oklahoma State research team found that T. rex could pulverize bones, chomping down with nearly 8,000 pounds of force.

Science

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Regeneration, Macrophage, Tissue Regeneration, African spiny mouse, Immune Cells, scar tissue, University Of Kentucky, human regenerative medicine

UK Researchers Identify Macrophages as Key Factor for Regeneration in Mammals

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The team’s findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how immune cells might be harnessed to someday help stimulate tissue regeneration in humans.

Science

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Fossils, Argentina, Flowers, Cornell University, History, Cretaceous Period, Paleocene epoch

Oldest Buckthorn Fossilized Flowers Found in Argentina

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Around 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, a giant asteroid crashed into the present-day Gulf of Mexico, leading to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. How plants were affected is less understood, but fossil records show that ferns were the first plants to recover many thousands of years afterward. Now, a team including Cornell researchers reports the discovery of the first fossilized flowers from South America, and perhaps the entire Southern Hemisphere, following the extinction event

Science

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dinosaur discovery, Dinosaur, new species, sauropod

New Dinosaur Species Increases the Diversity of the 'Whiplash Dinosaurs'

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New sauropod species is named Galeamopus pabsti by the same team which recently reinstated the brontosaurus as a distinct genus.

Science

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Megafauna, Extinction, Ancient Dna, Ice Age, Evolution, Climate Change

Megafaunal Extinctions Driven by Too Much Moisture

Studies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago. The persistent moisture resulting from melting permafrost and glaciers caused widespread glacial-age grasslands to be rapidly replaced by peatlands and bogs, fragmenting populations of large herbivore grazers.

Science

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mass spectometry, laser ablation , isotopic analysis, isotopi, Fossilization

New Lab Helps Scientists Study the Earth’s Oldest Fossils, Minerals, Rocks

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A new facility at the University of Arkansas combines laser ablation and mass spectrometry for quick, efficient analysis of trace elements and radiogenic isotopes.

Science

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A Kiss of Death -- Mammals Were the First Animals to Produce Venom

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CT scans of fossils of the pre-mammalian reptile, Euchambersia, shows anatomical features, designed for venom production

Science

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Pterosaur, dinosaur discovery

Giant Flying Reptile Ruled Ancient Transylvania

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The creature has a considerably shorter and stronger neck with larger muscles than the long graceful necks of others in its species.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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archealogy, Upper Paleolithic, Italy, Funerary, Arizona State University, Anthropology

Broken Pebbles Offer Clues to Paleolithic Funeral Rituals

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Researchers from Canada, the U.S. and Italy uncover evidence that people in the Upper Paleolithic Period used stone spatulas to decorate the bodies of the dead with ochre

Science

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Paleobiology, Megafaunal extinction, Australia, Climate Change, Global Warming, Paleontology

Climate Change Helped Kill Off Super-Sized Ice Age Animals in Australia

Changes in the diets of the super-sized megafauna that ruled Australia during the last Ice Age indicate that climate change was a major factor in their extinction.







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