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Environmental Science

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Gulf Long-term Follow-up Study, GuLF STUDY, 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Cleanup Workers, Heatlh, Health Effects, Dispersants, Corexit EC9500A, Corexit EC9527A, National Institute Of Environmental Health Sciences, Niehs

Gulf Spill Oil Dispersants Associated with Health Symptoms in Cleanup Workers

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Workers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study appeared online Sept. 15 in Environmental Health Perspectives and is the first research to examine dispersant-related health symptoms in humans.

Science

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Erosion, beach erosion, hurricane damage, Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey May Have Worsened Beach Erosion

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Hurricane Harvey left its mark on much of the Texas coast, leaving at least $100 billion in damages, but it very likely worsened a problem that has been plaguing the coast for years – beach erosion.

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Sustainability, Climate Change, Business

Business Leaders Won’t Wait for White House to Tackle Climate Change

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UF Experts Offer Tips for Tree, Lawn Survival Post-Irma

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Researchers and Extension faculty suggest resetting uprooted palms and trees only after they have been examined for safety and deemed worthy of replanting. For hardwood trees, if a majority of major anchor roots have been fractured, it is unlikely that such trees will successfully reestablish themselves, and they will likely fail in future storms. Uprooted trees and palms in good condition should be replanted as soon as possible and watered frequently.

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Oak wilt, New York City, Cornell University, Trees, Brooklyn, Long Island, Fungus, NYSDEC

Devastating Tree Fungus Found in Brooklyn and Four Long Island Towns

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Cornell University scientists in partnership with state agencies identified oak wilt, a devastating pathogenic fungus that kills oak trees, in six new locations throughout New York state: four towns on Long Island, Brooklyn and Canandaigua.

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Rogue Waves, El Faro, Hurricane, sea conditions, Ocean, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Rogue Wave Analysis Supports Investigation of the El Faro Sinking

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A new analysis done to support the investigation into the 2015 sinking of the El Faro cargo ship has calculated the likelihood of a massive rogue wave during Hurricane Joaquin in October of that year – and demonstrated a new technique for evaluating the probability of rogue waves over space and time.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Hurricane Jose, Cornell University, Weather, Storms, Meteorology, Emergency Preparedness

Jose on the Way, East Coast Residents Need to Prepare Today

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artificial photosynthesis, CO2 reduction, solar fuels, Nano Catalyst

Solar-to-Fuel System Recycles CO2 to Make Ethanol and Ethylene

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Berkeley Lab scientists have harnessed the power of photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide into fuels and alcohols at efficiencies far greater than plants. The achievement marks a significant advance in the effort to move toward sustainable sources of fuel.

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Fishing, fishery management, Income, Fisheries Policy, fisheries management, Sustaibability, permit, Natural Resources

Catching a Diversity of Fish Species — Instead of Specializing — Means More Stable Income for Fishers

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A team of scientists analyzed nearly 30 years of revenue and permitting records for individuals fishing in Alaskan waters and tracked how their fishing choices, in terms of permits purchased and species caught, influenced their year-to-year income volatility.

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Plants, Trees, Water, Hydrology, soil hydrology, Science, Roots, Groundwater, Charles Darwin, Climate, Climate Change, Adaptation, Resilience, soil, Nutrients, Environment, Food Chain, Seeds, Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, Greenhouse Gas, grasses, Shrubs, herbaceous plants, succulents, Forests, rain forests, Amazon, Amazon Rainforest, Ecosystem, Ecology

Deep Roots in Plants Driven by Soil Hydrology

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Searching for water, some tree roots probe hundreds of feet deep and many trees send roots through cracks in rocks, according to a new study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick professor. Moreover, the depth of plant roots, which varies between species and soil conditions, will play a key role in plants’ adaptation to climate change, said Ying Fan Reinfelder, a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Department of Environmental Sciences.







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