Feature Channels:

Technology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Tech regulations, telecommunications industry, 5G technology, Wireless Communication, House committee on energy and commerce, Privacy, Big Data

In Discussing 5G Technology, Regulators Eye Privacy Concerns

Science

Channels:

Jamming, First Responders, responder tech, GPS, Communications

S&T Helps First Responders Mitigate Potential Jamming

DAZ5733720-1.jpg

DHS S&T hosted a week-long 2017 First Responder Electronic Jamming Exercise (JamX 17) at Idaho National Lab (INL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho where nearly 100 federal, state, and local public safety and private organizations gathered to test tactics and technologies.

Medicine

Channels:

Electronic Health Record, Electronic Medical Record, EMR, EHR, Health It, Health Technology, Patient Care, Patient Safety, Collaboration, academic medical centers

Epic Sharing within UC Health

longhurst_christopher.jpg

In an unprecedented move, UC San Diego Health and UCI Health have formed a strategic partnership to increase operational efficiencies and decrease patient care costs by sharing a single electronic medical records (EMR) platform.

Science

Channels:

Michael Yip, Robotics, Machine Learning, collision detection, Robot Assisted, Robot Assisted Surgery, contextual robotics, Contextual Robotics Institute, UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, electrical and computer engineering

Speedy Collision Detector Could Make Robots Better Human Assistants

FACEBOOK-Fastron-collision-detection.jpg

A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed “Fastron,” runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time.

Science

Channels:

H-coils, Magnetic Field, magnetic field strength, single sheet tester, Measuring, exciting coil, coil, Ryo Matsubara, Yasuhito Takahashi, Koji Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki Ishihara, Daichi Azuma, Doshisha University, AIP Advances

Are Multiple H-Coils Needed to Accurately Measure Magnetic Field Strengths?

Is more always better? Researchers in Kyoto, Japan, sought to find out if that was the case for measuring magnetic field strengths. Their paper, appearing this week in AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, examines whether a double H-coil method or a single H-coil method is a more accurate way to measure magnetic field strength.

Science

Channels:

Artifical Intelligence, Machine Learning, Engineering design, Industrial Engineering, Computer Science

Can Computers Be Creative?

Penn State researchers are using DARPA funding to teach computers how to generate original design ideas and then determine if those ideas are feasible in the real world.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Texting, Text Messaging, text messages, Smartphones, emoticons, emoji, Psychology, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, textisms, Conversation, Linguistics, Language, Written language, Mobile Phones, Phones, Communication, Millennials, Writing, Grammar, Electronic Communication, digital communication

Study: Punctuation in Text Messages Helps Replace Cues Found in Face-to-Face Conversations

Emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren’t sloppy or a sign that written language is going down the tubes — these “textisms” help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation, according to newly published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Science

Channels:

Robot, Robotics, Bioengineering, Prosthesis, Prosthetic Hand, EEG, EEG, brain machine interface, wearables, cognitive science, bioengineering, Brain, Behavior, Microfluidics, orthopedic and rehabilitative services, Sensors, Neurotrauma, Amputees, Nerve Regeneration

Bioengineered Robotic Hand with Its Own Nervous System Will Sense Touch

Researchers are developing a first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand that will actually feel and adapt to its environment. This “living” robot will have its own peripheral nervous system directly linking robotic sensors and actuators.

Science

Channels:

Plesiosaurs, Dinosaurs, Jurassic Period, flipper, Swimming, Propulsion, robotic vehicle, Hydrodynamics, Bioinspired, bioinspired design, Gabriel Weymouth, Kate Devereux, Nick Copsey, Luke Muscutt, Jon Downes, Bharath Ganapathisubramani, University of Southampton, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Nov-2017 8:00 AM EST

Science

Channels:

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), Mathematics, computing & computer science

CANDLE Shines in 2017 HPCwire Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards

HPCwire_award_900x326p.jpg

Argonne National Laboratory has been recognized in the annual HPCwire Readers’ and Editors’ Choice Awards, presented at the 2017 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis (SC17), in Denver, Colorado.







Chat now!