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Science

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Pollution, Chemistry

Polluting Plastic Particles Invade the Great Lakes

Floating plastic debris — which helps populate the infamous “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” in the Pacific Ocean — has become a problem in the Great Lakes, the largest body of fresh water in the world. Scientists reported on the latest findings from the Great Lakes here today at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

Science

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Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science

Seemingly Small Research Funding Cuts Could Hinder Progress in Nanotechnology

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Cuts in federal funding of nanotechnology research threaten to slow progress toward some of the field’s greatest promises, including commercialization of sustainable new energy sources that do not contribute to global warming, an international authority in the field cautioned here today.

Science

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Chemistry, Science, Environment, Grants, Climate Change, Research

American Chemical Society Announces First Presidential Climate Science Challenge Grants

The American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced awarding of the first grants in a new initiative intended to increase understanding of the science underpinning global climate change among thousands of people around the country. Bassam Z. Shakhashiri, Ph.D., 2012 president of ACS, the world’s largest scientific society, said that 12 of the society’s local sections will receive ACS Presidential Climate Science Challenge Grants.

Science

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Alcohol, hangover tips, Chemistry

On Yak-a-mein Soup, a.k.a., ‘Old Sober’ 

One of the Crescent City’s time-honored traditions – a steaming bowl of Yak-a-mein Soup, a.k.a., “Old Sober” — after a night of partying in the French Quarter actually does have a basis in scientific fact. That was the word today from an overview of the chemistry of hangovers, presented as part of the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

Medicine

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Freundlich, Tuberculosis, Computer, Bayesian, Cytotoxicity, Bioactivity, Ekins, New Jersey Medical School, UMDNJ, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, HTS data, Drug Discovery

Faster, Smarter and Cheaper Drug Discovery

A team led by Sean Ekins at Collaborative Drug Discovery in Burlingame, Cal., and Joel Freundlich at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School has trained computers to sift through drug libraries and pick out compounds likely to clobber TB with minimal side effects to humans. They have ‘taught’ the computers to understand which chemical features of a drug are associated with efficacy against TB and which are associated with toxicity to mammalian cells. The process may lead to much less trial and error in finding new therapies. The computers even rediscovered a compound reported 40 years ago to have anti-TB activity but since forgotten.

Science

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FUEL, Combustion, Engine Efficiency, Engineering, Droplets, Rocket Engine, internal combustion engines, Missiles, Fuel Spray, Computer Modeling, Mathematical Modeling

Model Allows Engineers to Test Fuel Systems on Computers

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Engineers will be able to design better fuel systems for everything from motorcycles to rockets faster and more inexpensively because of a mathematical fuels model developed at The University of Alabama in Huntsville.

Science

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infrared light, Water, vibrational spectroscopy, Biological Chemistry, Molecular Biophysics, disordered proteins

Watery Research Theme to Flow Through New Tokmakoff Lab

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Chemistry Professor Andrei Tokmakoff arrived at the University of Chicago in January to tackle new problems in biology with the aid of ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy methods that he has developed.

Science

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Cancer, Genetics, Cell Biology, Biology

Asterix’s Roman Foes – Researchers Have a Better Idea of How Cancer Cells Move and Grow

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Researchers at the University of Montreal’s Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) have discovered a new mechanism that allows some cells in our body to move together, in some ways like the tortoise formation used by Roman soldiers depicted in the Asterix series.

Science

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Diamond, Corrosion, Graphene, Hydrothermal, nanobubbles, Crystal, Water, superheated, Supercritical, Supercritical Fluids

Graphene Researchers Create “Superheated” Water That Can Corrode Diamonds

Novel discovery paves the way to improve waste degradation and laser-assisted etching of materials.

Science

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Key to TB Cure Could Lie Underwater

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers are collecting actinomycete bacteria from water throughout the world in a hunt for new antibiotics.







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