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English, Humanities, Environment, Climate Change, Waste

Discovering the Art of Waste

Stephanie Foote is the first West Virginia University faculty member to be chosen for a National Humanities Center Fellowship. Foote is in residence at the National Humanities Center in Durham, N.C. for the 2017-18 academic year while working on her book about waste.

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Food Allergies, Lunch Packing Tips, Cancer Changing Sense of Taste, and More in the Food Science News Source

Click here to go to the Food Science News Source

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Children's Anxiety, Thriving After Cancer, Unnecessary Antibiotics, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Folic Acid, Autism, Pesticide Exposure, UC Davis MIND Institute

Folic Acid May Mitigate Autism Risk From Pesticides

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Researchers at UC Davis and other institutions have shown that mothers who take recommended amounts of folic acid around conception might reduce their children’s pesticide-related autism risk.

Medicine

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Dermatology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Vitamin D, mustard gas, chemical threats, National Institutes of Health, NIH Award, toxic exosure, immune system response, Chemical Weapons, NIH countermeasures against chemical threats, counteract, Skin Repair, toxic chemical exposure

CWRU’s Kurt Lu, MD Receives $3.9 Million NIH Grant to Expand Countermeasures against Chemical Threats, Including Mustard Gas

Kurt Lu, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has received a five year, $3.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to expand countermeasures against chemical threats, including mustard gas and mustard-related compounds. The molecular action of mustard on DNA leads to strand breaks and eventual cell death. The goal of the grant is to augment the body’s immune system after exposure, reducing skin swelling and pain as well as enhancing tissue repair.

Science

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magnet recycling, Ames Laboratory, Critical Materials Institute, Rare Earth Magnets, Rare Earth Material, rare earth recovery, Patent

Critical Materials Institute Develops New Acid-Free Magnet Recycling Process

A new rare-earth magnet recycling process developed by researchers at the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) dissolves magnets in an acid-free solution and recovers high purity rare earth elements.

Science

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eletricity , Cotton

Cotton Gin Trash Finding New Life for Electrical Power

COLLEGE STATION – Finding sustainable markets for gin trash, wood chips and other waste products could be viable in producing more electrical power for a growing global population, according to researchers. A demonstration was held recently on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station showcasing a biomass-fueled fluidized bed gasifier, utilizing cotton gin trash and wood chips to power an electric generator. The fluidized bed gasification system was developed in the 1980s when a patent was issued to Drs. Calvin Parnell Jr. and W.A. Lepori, who were both part of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station now Texas A&M AgriLife Research.

Medicine

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Nyu Langone, Trasande, Teams, toxic dust, PFAS, PFOA, perfluoroalkyl, Heart Disease, LDL, Cardiovascular Risk Factors

Children Exposed to Chemicals in 9/11 "Dust" Show Early Signs of Risk of Heart Disease

Sixteen years after the collapse of the World Trade Center towers sent a “cloud” of toxic debris across Lower Manhattan, children living nearby who likely breathed in the ash and fumes are showing early signs of risk for future heart disease.

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Climate Change, Deforestation, Land Use

Deforestation Long Overlooked as Contributor to Climate Change

When it comes to tackling climate change, the focus often falls on reducing the use of fossil fuels and developing sustainable energy sources. But a new Cornell University study shows that deforestation and subsequent use of lands for agriculture or pasture, especially in tropical regions, contribute more to climate change than previously thought.

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Climate Science, Hurricane, parametric insurance, climate resilience, Food Security, Hurricane Irma

Environmental Health Expert Available to Discuss Expected Hurricane Irma Threat to the Carribean







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