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Science

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Magnetism, nano

Molecular Magnetism Packs Power with “Messenger Electron”

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A UW–Madison lab has made a molecule that gains magnetic strength through an unusual way of controlling those spins, which could lead to a breakthrough in quantam computing.

Science

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chlorite dismutase, Biochemistry, Bioremediation

Neutrons Probe Oxygen-Generating Enzyme for a Greener Approach to Clean Water

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An international researcher team used neutron analysis at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, x-ray crystallography and other techniques to study chlorite dismutase, an enzyme that breaks down the environmental pollutant chlorite into harmless byproducts. The results shed light on the catalytic process and open possibilities for bioremediation.

Science

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Chemistry, Biochemistry, Synthetic Chemistry, Biosynthesis, Enzymes, Catalysts, Pharmaceuticals, Drug Discovery

Biocatalysts Are a Bridge to Greener, More Powerful Chemistry

New research from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute is building a bridge from nature's chemistry to greener, more efficient synthetic chemistry.

Science

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Subalpine Wildflowers, Butterfly Evolution, Ancient Mammals, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Aging, Drug Target, Inflammation, Biomarker

Biomarker May Predict Early Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers at SBP have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The discovery, published in Nature Communications, may also provide a means of homing drugs to diseased areas of the brain to treat AD, Parkinson’s disease, as well as glioblastoma, brain injuries and stroke.

Science

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Biofuels, Lignin, renewable energy development

New Routes to Renewables: Sandia Speeds Transformation of Biofuel Waste Into Wealth

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A Sandia National Laboratories-led team has demonstrated faster, more efficient ways to turn discarded plant matter into chemicals worth billions. The team’s findings could help transform the economics of making fuels and other products from domestically grown renewable sources.

Science

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toxicological sciences, Toxicology, TCE, PCE, Aflatoxin, AHR, Society Of Toxicology

Research Articles on Transcriptomics to Aid Risk Assessment, Pregnancy and Carcinogen Metabolism, and More Featured in Toxicological Sciences

Editor's Highlights include papers on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation and neutrophil function; transcriptomic analysis of TCE and PCE in the liver and kidney; functional genomics of TCE metabolites genotoxicity; and increased aflatoxin b1 damage in pregnant mice.

Science

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Theoretical Chemistry, Theory, Conference, northwest theoretical chemistry conference, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PNNL, Sotiris Xantheas, Greg Schenter, Gregory Schenter, Chemistry, Computational Chemistry

First Northwest Theoretical Chemistry Conference Is a Hit!

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The first Northwest Theoretical Chemistry Conference was a success. The event offered ~50 early career theorists and students opportunities to present talks in a nurturing environment that developed and advanced collaborations.

Science

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Gallium Nitride, Sensor, Transfer, boron nitride, MOVPE, nitrogen oxides

Transfer Technique Produces Wearable Gallium Nitride Gas Sensors

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A transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.

Medicine

Science

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HIV, virus budding, Virus, virus assembly, Biophysics, Modeling & Simulation, Chemistry, University Of Chicago, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Scientists Find Missing Clue to How HIV Hacks Cells to Propagate Itself

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Computer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the "budding" process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.







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