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Unique Mosasaur Fossil Discovered in Japan

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An international research partnership has discovered the first Mosasaur fossil of its kind to be found in Japan. Not only does the 72-million-year-old marine reptile fossil fill a biogeographical gap between the Middle East and the eastern Pacific, but also it holds new revelations because of its superior preservation.

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dinosauromorph, Dinosaurs, Natural History Museum of Utah, University Of Utah, Paleontology, Earth Sciences, Argentina

Dinosaur Relatives and First Dinosaurs More Closely Connected Than Previously Thought

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A new study by a team of scientists from Argentina, Brazil, California and the Natural History Museum of Utah at the University of Utah has determined that the time elapsed between the emergence of early dinosaur relatives and the origin of the first dinosaurs is much shorter than previously believed.

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Hundreds of Enormous Footprints Left by Dinosaurs Found Along a Lagoon in Scotland

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UK researchers stumbled across several hundred dinosaur footprints in a coastal lagoon on the Isle of Skye, which they dated to the Middle Jurassic, 170 million years ago. The researchers, which include Stephen Brusatte from the University of Edinburgh, UK and his colleague Tom Challands, surmise that the footprints were left by sauropods, primitive cousins of the more famous Brontosaurus and Diplodocus. The largest of the footprints measure around 70 centimetres across, larger than those that would have been left by T. Rex. This find is the largest dinosaur site found in Scotland to date. The researchers report their findings in the Scottish Journal of Geology.

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Study Of Reptile Fossil Reveals How Snakes May Have Lost Their Limbs

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Findings, recently published in the journal Science Advances, show that snakes did not lose their limbs in order to live in the sea, as has been previously suggested. The research led by scientists at the University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences involves the analysis of a 90-year old reptilian fossil of Dinilysia patagonica, a 2-meter long reptile. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the bony inner ear of Dinilysia patagonica reveals how this ancestor to modern snakes became adept at burrowing.

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Eat a Paleo Peach: First Fossil Peaches Discovered in Southwest China

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The sweet, juicy peaches we love today might have been a popular snack long before modern humans arrived on the scene. Scientists have found eight well-preserved fossilized peach endocarps, or pits, in southwest China dating back more than two and a half million years. Despite their age, the fossils appear nearly identical to modern peach pits.

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Computer Model Helps Explain Bizarre Prehistoric Sea Creature

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Using a computer model, scientists were able to show that Tribrachidium, a disc shaped seas creature that lived about 555-million-years ago, fed by collecting particles suspended in water. This is called suspension feeding and it had not previously been documented in organisms from this period of time.

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Science, Archaelogy, Climate Change, Earth, Environent

Tropical Fossil Forests Unearthed in Arctic Norway

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UK researchers have unearthed ancient fossil forests, thought to be partly responsible for one of the most dramatic shifts in the Earth’s climate in the past 400 million years.

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Single Tooth Analysis of Oldest-Known Plant-Visiting Bat Fossil Suggests It Was Omnivorous

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A Stony Brook University-led team of evolutionary biologists has discovered that the oldest known nectar-drinking bat fossil, Palynephyllum antimaster, was probably omnivorous.

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Ancient Brains Turn Paleontology on Its Head

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A UA researcher has provided the strongest evidence yet that it's possible for brains to fossilize and, in fact, a set of 520-million-year-old arthropod brains have done just that.

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Ancient Humans Hunted Dog-Size Rats in Present-Day Timor

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In findings presented last week at the Meetings of the Society of Vertebrate Palaeontology in Texas, scientists identified the fossil remains of rats the size of small dogs found on the Indonesian island of Timor. According to archeological evidence from the area, humans (who were present in Timor starting at least 46,000 years ago) regularly hunted and butchered these megafauna.







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