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Science

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Cleaning Products

ACI Says Safety Built Into Cleaning Product DNA, Refutes Study Designed to Scare Consumers

The American Cleaning Institute expressed disappointment with research which wrongly raises unfounded safety concerns over cleaning products and ignores enhanced efforts to communicate with consumers about product ingredients. ACI said that the paper – co-written by the interest group Silent Spring Institute in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives – distorts the established safety of ingredients used in cleaning products by inappropriately equating their detection with health issues.

Science

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K-State, Kansas State University, Geology, Manganese, air, Pollution, Health

Manganese Concentrations Higher in Residential Neighborhoods Than Industrial Sites

A study finds manganese in the air of residential neighborhoods at higher levels than in manufacturing industries.

Science

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Water Quality Research, wastwater, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Pharmaceticals, Enviromental Health, fish biology

Fish Exposed to SSRIs Exhibit Abnormal Behavior

Fish exhibit abnormal behavior and lower levels of anxiety when exposed to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI), which are common drugs used to treat depression, among other disorders. The study, by Baylor University researchers and online in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, also found that human data for drug activity can be used to predict surface water concentrations of these substances that negatively impact fish behavior.

Medicine

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Seattle Children's Hospital Research Institute, Pediatric Health, Environmental Health, Reproductive Health, Environmental Toxins

Reproductive Health Providers Should Discuss Environmental Exposure Risks with Patients

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Simple recommendations help reduce harmful exposures for women.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Chemicals, TSCA, European Union

Report Examines What U.S. Can Learn From Eu Chemicals Law

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A new report from Indiana University supplies a close examination of the European Union's reformed chemicals law REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals), focusing on potential lessons for the U.S.

Medicine

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Neurotoxins In Shark Fins: A Human Health Concern

Sharks are among the most threatened of marine species worldwide due to unsustainable overfishing. They are primarily killed for their fins to fuel the growing demand for shark fin soup, which is an Asia delicacy. A new study by University of Miami (UM) scientists in the journal Marine Drugs has discovered high concentrations of BMAA in shark fins, a neurotoxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases in humans including Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig Disease (ALS). The study suggests that consumption of shark fin soup and cartilage pills may pose a significant health risk for degenerative brain diseases.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Researcher Investigates - “Are We Getting Sick From Boat Harbour?”

Dalhousie University researcher Heather Castleden has been invited by the Pictou Landing Native Women's Association (PLNWA) to engage in community-based participatory health research in the area in search of a definitive answer to the question; "Are we getting sick from Boat Harbour?"

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Expert Available to Comment on the Human Health Aspects of the UN’s Newly Announced Initiative for Climate Change and Clean Air

Dr. Lynn Goldman, Dean of the GW School of Public Health and Health Services is available to comment on the human health aspects of the newly announced UN initiative for climate change and clean air aimed at reducing short-lived climate pollutants

Medicine

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Short-Term Exposure to Most Major Air Pollutants Associated with Increased Risk of Heart Attack

Short-term exposure (for up to 7 days) to all major air pollutants, with the exception of ozone, is significantly associated with an increased risk of heart attack, according to a review and meta-analysis of previous studies appearing in the February 15 issue of JAMA.

Medicine

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Stroke, Air Pollution

Even Moderate Air Pollution Can Raise Stroke Risks

Air pollution, even at levels generally considered safe by federal regulations, increases the risk of stroke by 34 percent, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers have found.







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