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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST

Study Finds Little Increased Risk of Injury in High-Intensity Functional Training Program

Mayo Clinic

High-intensity group workout classes are increasingly popular at fitness centers. While research has shown that these workouts can have cardiovascular and other benefits, few studies have been conducted on whether they lead to more injuries.

Channels: All Journal News, Exercise and Fitness, Patient Safety, Sports Medicine,

Released:
2-Dec-2019 3:40 PM EST
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Loyola Launches Study on Pelvic Floor Dysfunction in Female Athletes

Loyola Medicine

A multidisciplinary team at Loyola Medicine is launching a clinical research study to determine the most prevalent factors impacting young women’s pelvic health.

Channels: All Journal News, Bone Health, Sports, Sports Medicine, Women's Health,

Released:
27-Nov-2019 12:20 PM EST
Research Results
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Tips for Running Outside this Winter

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Julie Ruane, a nurse practitioner in the Division of Sports Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), shares tips for running outside in the winter.

Channels: Sports, Sports Medicine, Exercise and Fitness,

Released:
27-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
Research Results
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Changes in pupils after asymptomatic high-acceleration head impacts indicate changes in brain function

Journal of Neurosurgery

Researchers used quantitative pupillometry to detect pupillary changes in high-school athletes after they sustained a high-acceleration head impact. These pupillary changes, indicative of changes in brain function, were evident even when the athletes had no discernible symptoms.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Neuro, Sports, Sports Medicine,

Released:
26-Nov-2019 8:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Nov-2019 6:30 PM EST

New WHO-led study says majority of adolescents worldwide are not sufficiently physically active, putting their current and future health at risk

World Health Organization (WHO)

The first ever global trends for adolescent insufficient physical activity show that urgent action is needed to increase physical activity levels in girls and boys aged 11 to 17 years. The study, published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal and produced by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO), finds that more than 80% of school-going adolescents globally did not meet current recommendations of at least one hour of physical activity per day – including 85% of girls and 78% of boys.

Channels: Children's Health, Exercise and Fitness, Obesity, Public Health, The Lancet, All Journal News, Sports Medicine, Staff Picks,

Released:
19-Nov-2019 11:05 AM EST
Research Results
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Study Finds That Student Athlete Safety Is Not a Priority in High Schools Across the United States

National Athletic Trainers' Association

A study released today showed that 34% of public and private high schools, have no access to athletic trainers in the United Stated. Furthermore, the study indicates that lack of appropriate sports medicine care is even greater for private schools (45% with no AT access) where parents are traditionally paying for what they perceive as a better and safer experience.

Channels: All Journal News, Education, Healthcare, Patient Safety, Public Health, Sports, Sports Medicine,

Released:
21-Nov-2019 11:45 AM EST
Research Results
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Loyola Medicine Researchers Recommend Increased Medical Sideline Coverage for Chicago Public High School Football Games

Loyola Medicine

Researchers at Loyola Medicine recently completed a follow-up study to reassess the state of medical sideline coverage during football games and practices at the 99 Chicago public high schools.

Channels: All Journal News, Education, Healthcare, Patient Safety, Sports, Sports Medicine,

Released:
19-Nov-2019 3:50 PM EST
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Gaining an Edge with Performance Training

Henry Ford Health System

At the new William Clay Ford Center for Athletic Medicine, athletes at all levels of sport, weekend warriors and those who exercise to simply stay active will have access to the latest advancements in sports performance technology and physical therapy to boost performance and rehab an injury.

Channels: All Journal News, Healthcare, Sports, Sports Medicine, Technology,

Released:
8-Nov-2019 4:45 PM EST
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