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Medicine

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Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Kidney Damage, cardiorenal syndrome, Resolvin

Resolvin D-1 Limits Kidney Damage After Heart Attacks

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Lingering inflammation after heart attack can lead heart failure. It can also claim another victim — the kidneys. New research shows that a bioactive compound called resolvin D-1, injected as a therapeutic dose, is able to limit this collateral damage in the kidneys, as tested in an animal model.

Medicine

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Women And Heart Disease, Women and Heart Attacks , Heart Disease In Women

Women Once Considered Low Risk for Heart Disease Shown to Have Evidence of Previous Heart Attack Scars

Women who complain about chest pain often are reassured by their doctors that there is no reason to worry because their angiograms show that the women don’t have blockages in the major heart arteries, a primary cause of heart attacks in men. But a National Institutes of Health study led by investigators at the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center in the Smidt Heart Institute, shows that about 8% of those women actually have scars on their heart that indicate they experienced a heart attack.

Medicine

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Feb-2018 12:00 AM EST

Science

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Biomedical, biomedical device, Biosensor, Sensor, Sensor Technology, Cardiovacular Disease, heart diseaes, Heart Attack, Medical sensors

Portable Biosensor Warns of Heart Attack and Stroke

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A team of researchers has developed a low-cost, portable medical sensor package that has the potential to alert users of medical issues ranging from severe heart conditions to cancer, according to a study published in the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, Cardiology, Chiadi Ndumele

Number of Obese Years Not — Just Obesity — a Distinct Risk Factor for Heart Damage

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In an analysis of clinical data collected on more than 9,000 people, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that the number of years spent overweight or obese appear to “add up” to a distinct risk factor that makes those with a longer history of heaviness more likely to test positive for a chemical marker of so-called “silent” heart damage than those with a shorter history.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Electrophysiology, Cardiovacular Disease, Afib, Atrial fibrilation, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

African Americans with Atrial Fibrillation at Significantly Higher Risk for Stroke Compared to Caucasians with the Disease

African Americans with atrial fibrillation (AF) – a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to a host of dangerous complications – have a significantly higher risk of stroke than Caucasians with the condition, according to new research published today in HeartRhythm by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The new findings build on previous studies examining the impact of race on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), which is linked to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other complications. It’s well reported that African Americans have a lower risk of developing AF as compared to Caucasians, but until now, there was little data on the additional risks that come with AF for each race.

Science

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Genome, Genetics, Sequencing, Mutations, cardiovascuar disease, Computer Science, Algorithm

New Algorithm Can Pinpoint Mutations Favored by Natural Selection in Large Sections of the Human Genome

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A team of scientists has developed an algorithm that can accurately pinpoint, in large regions of the human genome, mutations favored by natural selection. The finding provides deeper insight into how evolution works, and ultimately could lead to better treatments for genetic disorders. For example, adaptation to chronic hypoxia at high altitude can suggest targets for cardiovascular and other ischemic diseases.

Medicine

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Heart, Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, AI, Heart Research, Heart Failure, University Health Network

Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research Unveils Its First Million Dollar Visionary Projects

As the world marks international Heart Month, the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research today announces its first-ever $1 million innovation grants, awarded to world-first projects positioned to alleviate the massive burden of heart failure on patients, loved ones and health-care systems.

Science

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Heart, Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation, Heart Surgery, fMRI, Heart Surgeon, Valentine's Day

OU Researcher Uses Geometry for Affairs of the Heart

An OU researcher's recent work is focused on a predictive surgery for a serious heart condition called Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation, which affects approximately 1.6 million Americans. The team uses to clinical image data, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical computed tomography, to reconstruct a 3D computational model of the heart, guiding surgeons on the best approach to repair FTR in a particular patient and reducing the risk of reoccurrence.

Medicine

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Smidt Heart Institute, Harbor Freight

Harbor Freight Tools Owner and His Foundation Give $50M to Create Smidt Heart Institute

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Cedars-Sinai announced today a $50 million gift from Eric and Susan Smidt and The Smidt Foundation to create the Smidt Heart Institute. The gift will advance vital research and innovative practices across the fields of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. The gift—the largest in Cedars-Sinai’s 116-year history—will enable the hospital to expand its research and treatment of heart conditions by pursuing the most innovative science, advancing clinical trials and emerging treatments, and training the next generation of heart specialists.







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