Curated News:

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 4:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
24-Jan-2020 6:25 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Jan-2020 4:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

JHSPH-new-logo.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Family Caregivers Are Rarely Asked About Needing Assistance With Caring for Older Adults

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Family caregivers usually are not asked by health care workers about needing support in managing older adults’ care, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: Aging, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Family and Parenting, Healthcare, National Institute on Aging (NIA), JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 1:30 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Study to examine biomarkers, economic factors that may increase risk for cognitive decline

Study to examine biomarkers, economic factors that may increase risk for cognitive decline

Iowa State University

An image of your retina may help determine your risk for Alzheimer’s disease even before other symptoms are detectable. Iowa State researchers will use the retinal images, cognitive measurements and economic data to determine if this information can identify risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Channels: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cognition and Learning, Healthcare, Vision, National Institute on Aging (NIA),

Released:
9-Jan-2020 10:30 AM EST
Research Results
UCSFLogo_1.png

Alzheimer 'tau' protein far surpasses amyloid in predicting toll on brain tissue

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Brain imaging of pathological tau-protein "tangles" reliably predicts the location of future brain atrophy in Alzheimer's patients a year or more in advance, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center.

Channels: Aging, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Clinical Trials, Neuro, Technology, National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), All Journal News,

Released:
2-Jan-2020 1:15 PM EST
Feature

Alzheimer's study shows promise in protecting brain from tau

University of Washington School of Medicine

In the search for an Alzheimer’s cure, the scientific community has focused on drugs to lessen the buildup of amyloid protein in the brain. But new research published today in Science Translational Medicine finds that targeting tau pathology shows promise.The discovery came by looking at what could make worms resistant to pathological tau protein. That’s when researchers discovered the role of the MSUT2 gene. The latest study applied to mice as well. And held true in autopsy samples of Alzheimer's patients.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Clinical Trials, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, National Institute on Aging (NIA),

Released:
18-Dec-2019 3:10 PM EST
Research Results
WFBH_color.jpg
Released:
9-Dec-2019 2:40 PM EST
Research Results

Effort to Examine Alzheimer’s Impact on Pain Processing

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A new multisite study funded by the National Institute on Aging will examine whether co-occurring Alzheimer’s disease and stage 4 breast or prostate cancer alters pain perception, potentially leading to undertreated cancer pain.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Cancer, Healthcare, Pain, National Institute on Aging (NIA), Grant Funded News,

Released:
21-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Research Results
rutgerslogo copy.jpg

Rutgers-Led Collaborative Awarded $3.6M NIH Grant to Build Infrastructure for Minority Aging Research

Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

The award will allow the New Jersey Minority Aging Collaborative (NJMAC), led by the Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, to build the infrastructure necessary to enable minority older adults across the state to participate in clinical studies. This will provide researchers and the community with more relevant information and ultimately serve to improve health equity in New Jersey.

Channels: Aging, Race and Ethnicity, Local - New Jersey, National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
8-Oct-2019 9:00 PM EDT
Announcement


0.47419