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Newswise: 213356_web.jpg

Article ID: 720412

Dual Approach Needed to Save Sinking Cities and Bleaching Corals

Duke University

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them precious time in their fight against sea-level rise

Released:
8-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Sep-2019 8:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 718940

To Address Hunger, Many Countries May Have to Increase Carbon Footprint

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Achieving an adequate, healthy diet in most low- and middle-income countries will require a substantial increase in greenhouse gas emissions and water use due to food production, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released:
13-Sep-2019 8:45 AM EDT
Newswise: N.C. Study: Warmer Water Linked to Higher Proportion of Male Flounder

Article ID: 712161

N.C. Study: Warmer Water Linked to Higher Proportion of Male Flounder

North Carolina State University

In the wild and in the lab, researchers find a relationship between higher water temperatures and a lower percentage of female flounder, a cause for concern.

Released:
30-Apr-2019 3:00 PM EDT
Newswise: Amazonian Peatlands May Soon Switch From a Carbon Sink to a Carbon Source

Article ID: 704239

Amazonian Peatlands May Soon Switch From a Carbon Sink to a Carbon Source

Arizona State University (ASU)

Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we’ve created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. These ecosystems are deteriorating at the hand of climate change. Once destroyed, they may not only stop absorbing carbon from the atmosphere, but start emitting it.

Released:
19-Nov-2018 4:05 PM EST
Newswise: Global Warming Will Have Us Crying in What’s Left of Our Beer

Article ID: 702182

Global Warming Will Have Us Crying in What’s Left of Our Beer

University of California, Irvine

On top of rising sea levels, stronger hurricanes and worsening wildfires, scientists project that human-caused climate change will result in one of the most dire consequences imaginable: a disruption in the global beer supply.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Most Fires in Florida go Undetected

Article ID: 700498

Most Fires in Florida go Undetected

Florida State University

New study indicates common satellite imaging technologies vastly underestimate number of fires in Florida, detecting only 25 percent of burn area.

Released:
13-Sep-2018 11:30 AM EDT
Newswise: WCS Criticizes the Elimination of U.S. National Ocean Policy, Undermining the Health of the Ocean

Article ID: 696374

WCS Criticizes the Elimination of U.S. National Ocean Policy, Undermining the Health of the Ocean

Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS Executive Vice President for Public Affairs John Calvelli issued the following statement concerning rescission of the U.S. National Ocean Policy:

Released:
20-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Whether Wheat Weathers Heat Waves

Article ID: 696303

Whether Wheat Weathers Heat Waves

American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Unlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Consumers’ Food Choices Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Emissions Contributing to Climate Change

Article ID: 695783

Consumers’ Food Choices Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Emissions Contributing to Climate Change

Tufts University

Changes in diet have been proposed as a way to reduce carbon emissions from the food system. A new study provides the latest and most comprehensive estimate of greenhouse gas emissions generated by U.S. consumer food purchases, and assesses how those choices could affect diet and climate change.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 2:45 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: New Research Finds Tall and Older Amazonian Forests More Resistant to Droughts

Article ID: 695186

New Research Finds Tall and Older Amazonian Forests More Resistant to Droughts

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A new Columbia Engineering study shows that photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests--forests above 30m--is 3x less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Taller Amazonian forests were also found to be older, have more biomass and deeper rooting systems that enable them to access deeper soil moisture, making them more resilient to drought. The findings suggest that forest height + age are an important regulator of photosynthesis in response to droughts.

Released:
30-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

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