Focus:

Climate Channel Featured Story 2

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
Newswise: Melting Mongolian Ice Patches May Threaten Reindeer Pastoralism, Archeological Artefacts
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST

Melting Mongolian Ice Patches May Threaten Reindeer Pastoralism, Archeological Artefacts

PLOS

Northern Mongolian “eternal ice” is melting for the first time in memory, threatening the traditional reindeer-herding lifestyle and exposing fragile cultural artifacts to the elements, according to a study published November 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by William Taylor from the Max Planck Institute, Germany, and the University of Colorado-Boulder, USA, and colleagues.

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Nature, Wildlife, Staff Picks, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
13-Nov-2019 2:05 PM EST

Dual Approach Needed to Save Sinking Cities and Bleaching Corals

Duke University

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them precious time in their fight against sea-level rise

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Pollution, Staff Picks,

Released:
8-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Research Results
JHSPH-new-logo.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Sep-2019 8:05 PM EDT

To Address Hunger, Many Countries May Have to Increase Carbon Footprint

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Achieving an adequate, healthy diet in most low- and middle-income countries will require a substantial increase in greenhouse gas emissions and water use due to food production, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Green Tech, Plants, All Journal News, Agriculture, Global Food News,

Released:
13-Sep-2019 8:45 AM EDT
Research Results
Research Results
Newswise: Amazonian Peatlands May Soon Switch From a Carbon Sink to a Carbon Source

Amazonian Peatlands May Soon Switch From a Carbon Sink to a Carbon Source

Arizona State University (ASU)

Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we’ve created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. These ecosystems are deteriorating at the hand of climate change. Once destroyed, they may not only stop absorbing carbon from the atmosphere, but start emitting it.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science,

Released:
19-Nov-2018 4:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Global Warming Will Have Us Crying in What’s Left of Our Beer

Global Warming Will Have Us Crying in What’s Left of Our Beer

University of California, Irvine

On top of rising sea levels, stronger hurricanes and worsening wildfires, scientists project that human-caused climate change will result in one of the most dire consequences imaginable: a disruption in the global beer supply.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Drought, Floods, Hurricanes, Nature (journal), Local - California, Food Science, Plants, Staff Picks,

Released:
15-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Most Fires in Florida go Undetected
Released:
13-Sep-2018 11:30 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: WCS Criticizes the Elimination of U.S. National Ocean Policy, Undermining the Health of the Ocean

WCS Criticizes the Elimination of U.S. National Ocean Policy, Undermining the Health of the Ocean

Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS Executive Vice President for Public Affairs John Calvelli issued the following statement concerning rescission of the U.S. National Ocean Policy:

Channels: Marine Science, Wildlife, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro, U.S. Politics,

Released:
20-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Whether Wheat Weathers Heat Waves
Released:
20-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Policy
Newswise: Consumers’ Food Choices Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Emissions Contributing to Climate Change

Consumers’ Food Choices Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Emissions Contributing to Climate Change

Tufts University

Changes in diet have been proposed as a way to reduce carbon emissions from the food system. A new study provides the latest and most comprehensive estimate of greenhouse gas emissions generated by U.S. consumer food purchases, and assesses how those choices could affect diet and climate change.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Health, Food Science, Nutrition, Featured: DailyWire, Local - Massachusetts, Local - Boston Metro,

Released:
7-Jun-2018 2:45 PM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences



0.87305