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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jan-2020 10:55 AM EST

New Investments and Research Indicate Multi-Trillion Dollar Market for Climate Restoration Through Carbon-Capture

Thunderbird School of Global Management

Climate restoration is the global movement to remove the trillion tons of excess CO2 from the atmosphere to restore our air to preindustrial levels of carbon dioxide and to preserve the Arctic ice. Given the climate emergency, climate restoration is a critical third pillar of climate action, complementing ongoing mitigation and adaptation efforts. New technologies and natural solutions for reducing CO2 levels in the next 30 years already exist and the costs for global-scale implementation are projected to be less than 1-3% of the global annual GDP.

Channels: Climate Science, Economics, Environmental Science, Green Tech, Technology, Entrepreneurship, All Journal News,

Released:
20-Jan-2020 7:30 PM EST
Newswise: 220348_web.jpg

Snowmageddon warnings in North America come from tropics more than Arctic stratosphere

University of Reading

Winter weather patterns in North America are dictated by changes to the polar vortex winds high in the atmosphere, but the most significant cold snaps are more likely influenced by the tropics, scientists have found.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Meteorology, Staff Picks,

Released:
27-Dec-2019 12:35 PM EST
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Newswise: 11_Stenzel_Greenland_2014_0824_0895_-768x512.jpg

Greenland ice loss is at ‘worse-case scenario’ levels, study finds

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Dec. 19, 2019 – Greenland is losing ice mass seven times faster than in the 1990s, a pace that matches the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s high-end warming scenario – in which 400 million people would be exposed to coastal flooding by 2100, 40 million more than in the mid-range prediction. The alarming update resulted from the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise, a project involving nearly 100 polar scientists from 50 international institutions, among them two from the University of California, Irvine.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
19-Dec-2019 12:05 PM EST
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Newswise: Study: Favorable Environments for Large Hail Increasing Across U.S.
Released:
9-Dec-2019 11:30 AM EST
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Newswise: Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought

Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought

University of South Australia

Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth – but new research by the University of South Australia suggests it could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science,

Released:
1-Dec-2019 7:05 PM EST
Research Results
  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2019 5:00 AM EST

Plants and fungi together could slow climate change

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new global assessment shows that human impacts have greatly reduced plant-fungus symbioses, which play a key role in sequestering carbon in soils. Restoring these ecosystems could be one strategy to slow climate change.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Nature (journal),

Released:
5-Nov-2019 6:05 AM EST
Research Results
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2019 6:00 AM EST
Released:
4-Nov-2019 8:05 AM EST
Research Results
Research Results

Law and Public Policy

Reframing Antarctica’s Meltwater Pond Dangers to Ice Shelves and Sea Level

Georgia Institute of Technology

Meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick ice shelf, which then shatters in just weeks, shocking scientists and speeding the flow of the glacier behind it into the ocean to drive up sea level. A new study puts damage by meltwater ponds to ice shelves and sea level into cool, mathematical perspective.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Grant Funded News,

Released:
25-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: Ancient Molecules from the Sea Burst Into the Air From Ocean Waves

Ancient Molecules from the Sea Burst Into the Air From Ocean Waves

Stony Brook University

When waves crash in the ocean, they inject tiny particles into the air that carry organic molecules more than 5,000 years old. This discovery, published in Science Advances by a national team of scientists, helps to solve a long-standing mystery as to what happens to ancient marine molecules.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Microbiome, Staff Picks, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Research Results


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