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Journal of Experimental Medicine

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Newswise: Creatine powers T cells’ fight against cancer

Article ID: 721010

Creatine powers T cells’ fight against cancer

UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research

The study, conducted in mice, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system.

Released:
18-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720282

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes a severe lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung’s airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach to treating IPF.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 720345

Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer’s

Washington University in St. Louis

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that microglia drive neurodegeneration in diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, that are linked to tau protein. Targeting microglia may help treat such diseases.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother’s immune response, study suggests
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Aug-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717066

Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother’s immune response, study suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

New research led by scientists at The Rockefeller University in New York may help explain why Zika virus infection causes birth defects in some children but not others. The study, which will be published August 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that the risk of developing an abnormally small head (microcephaly) depends on the types of antibody produced by pregnant mothers in response to Zika infection.

Released:
7-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Precision Editing of Gut Bacteria Reduces Cancer in Mice

Article ID: 716759

Precision Editing of Gut Bacteria Reduces Cancer in Mice

UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have shown that precision editing of the bacterial populations in the gut reduces inflammation-associated colorectal cancer in mice.

Released:
31-Jul-2019 5:00 PM EDT
Newswise: To kill tumors, activate this elite group of T cells

Article ID: 714769

To kill tumors, activate this elite group of T cells

La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRMs) are known to help the body fight infection, but they are also key tumor fighters. A new study reveals that these cells are unique in their ability to seek out and kill tumor cells without suffering from the common phenomenon of T cell “exhaustion.”

Released:
21-Jun-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714272

Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study, which will be published June 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body’s immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway could prevent the deaths of patients suffering rapid liver failure in response to viral infection.

Released:
12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713966

Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease. The study, which will be published June 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this human protein, known as CXCR4, could be a way to block the parasite’s life cycle and prevent the development of malaria.

Released:
5-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC
  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713305

Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC

The Rockefeller University Press

Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study, which will be published May 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their rapid growth and altering their susceptibility to immunotherapy.

Released:
22-May-2019 9:25 AM EDT
Newswise: Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals
  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712629

Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.

Released:
13-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

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