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Cell (journal)

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Released:
17-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Newswise: New Study Identifies Potential Path Forward for Brachial Plexus Injury Recovery

New Study Identifies Potential Path Forward for Brachial Plexus Injury Recovery

University of Notre Dame

The Notre Dame study has identified a strategy that may support the regeneration of nerves affected by the injury.

Channels: Surgery, Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 3:45 PM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
23-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
16-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST

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Research Results
Newswise: Zika Virus’ Key into Brain Cells ID’d, Leveraged to Block Infection and Kill Cancer Cells
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Zika Virus’ Key into Brain Cells ID’d, Leveraged to Block Infection and Kill Cancer Cells

University of California San Diego Health

Two different UC San Diego research teams identified the same molecule — αvβ5 integrin — as Zika virus’ key to brain cell entry. They found ways to take advantage of the integrin to both block Zika virus from infecting cells and turn it into something good: a way to shrink brain cancer stem cells.

Channels: Cancer, Cell Biology, Children's Health, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, OBGYN, Stem Cells, Vaccines, Zika Virus, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 3:35 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency—a rare disorder first described in 2012—lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorder’s wide-ranging symptoms—including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delays—and opens new avenues to find therapies to treat the disorder.

Channels: Children's Health, Genetics, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Staff Picks, Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: First-Ever Genomic Study of Puberty Yields Insights into Development, Cancer, and Infertility

First-Ever Genomic Study of Puberty Yields Insights into Development, Cancer, and Infertility

Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

In the first-ever genome-scale analysis of the puberty process in humans, researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) outline distinct and critical changes to stem cells in males during adolescence.

Channels: Cancer, Cell Biology, Children's Health, Stem Cells, Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 3:20 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: An Out-of-the-Box Attack on Diabetes
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

An Out-of-the-Box Attack on Diabetes

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

A protein newly identified as important in type 1 diabetes can delay onset of the disease in diabetic mice, providing a new target for prevention and treatment in people, according to research led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Indiana University School of Medicine.

Channels: Diabetes, Healthcare, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Cell (journal), DOE Science News, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 7:35 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: bitter-melon-960-min.jpg

Common Indian Fruit Shows Promise as a Cancer Fighter

Saint Louis University

According to recent research, the Asian fruit commonly eaten in India that also is known as bitter melon has properties that prevent cancer from growing and spreading. It also shows promise in slowing the progression of cancer, which is the world’s second deadliest disease.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Food Science, Health Food, Healthcare, Cell (journal),

Released:
8-Jan-2020 1:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: New Study Reveals the Origin of Complex Malaria Infections

New Study Reveals the Origin of Complex Malaria Infections

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

– New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D.

Channels: Blood, Children's Health, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Technology, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 12:55 PM EST
Research Results
UNM_ComprehensiveCancerCenter_Vertical_CMYK.jpg

Discovery Could Lead to New Breast Cancer Drugs

University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

Eric Prossnitz, PhD, and his team have recently completed studies on a compound that they think could be made to attack breast cancer cells differently than current drugs. Their work is reported in the November online issue of Cell Chemical Biology. This newly discovered behavior could turn the chemical into potent breast cancer drugs

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Pharmaceuticals, Women's Health, Cell (journal),

Released:
7-Jan-2020 6:05 AM EST
Research Results


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