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  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694625

Living Large: Exploration of Diverse Bacteria Signals Big Advance for Gene Function Prediction

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), including researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), have developed a workflow that enables large-scale, genome-wide assays of gene importance across many conditions. The study, “Mutant Phenotypes for Thousands of Bacterial Genes of Unknown Function,” has been published in the journal Nature and is by far the largest functional genomics study of bacteria ever published.

Released:
15-May-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694468

Big Data from World’s Largest Citizen Science Microbiome Project Serves Food for Thought

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and collaborators have published the first major results from the American Gut Project, a crowdsourced, global citizen science effort. The project, described May 15 in mSystems, is the largest published study to date of the human microbiome — the unique microbial communities that inhabit our bodies.

Released:
11-May-2018 2:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694217

New Research: Some Gut Bacteria May Protect Against Intestinal Infection

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Scientists have for the first time found evidence that a microbe in the human gut is associated with protection from typhoid fever infection. If the research is borne out, it could offer an exciting new way to reduce these infections.

Released:
8-May-2018 2:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694158

Researchers Discover Cellular Messengers Communicate with Bacteria in the Mouth

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA Gram negative F. nucleatum-induced host-generated tsRNA inhibits the growth of F. nucleatum (top row) but not Streptococcus mitis (bottom row).   A new UCLA-led study provides clear evidence that cellular messengers in saliva may be able to regulate the growth of oral bacteria responsible for diseases, such as periodontitis and meningitis.

Released:
7-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694012

Gut Check: Metabolites Shed by Intestinal Microbiota Keep Inflammation at Bay

Tufts University

Researchers discover how “good” intestinal bacteria can help protect us from inflammation, and how their disruption can increase susceptibility of the liver to more harmful forms of disease. Their study identified two metabolites from the bacteria that modulate inflammation in the host and reduce the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Released:
3-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693845

Microbes Living in a Toxic Volcanic Lake Could Hold Clues to Life on Mars

University of Colorado Boulder

Researchers have discovered microbes living in a toxic volcanic lake that may rank as one of the harshest environments on Earth.

Released:
2-May-2018 7:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693388

A Functional Genomics Database for Plant Microbiome Studies

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Catalog of candidate genes involved in plant-microbe relationships.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693503

Microbiome Food for Thought

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

How can dietary changes shape a person’s gut bacteria, and then how do those bacteria shape health and diseases, like obesity, diabetes, and susceptibility to infection diseases?

Released:
25-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692930

Drinking Kefir May Prompt Brain-Gut Communication to Lower Blood Pressure

American Physiological Society (APS)

Drinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 6:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Apr-2018 5:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 692664

Wiping Out the Gut Microbiome Could Help with Heart Failure

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

The bacteria that reside on and within our bodies are known to have a significant influence on our health. New research suggests wiping out the gut microbiota could improve heart functioning and potentially slow the cardiac damage that occurs with heart failure.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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