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Newswise: Think Twice About Vaping

Think Twice About Vaping

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

With the nationwide outbreak of vaping-related lung injuries, now is the time to learn the facts about e-cigarette use among kids and young adults.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Public Health, Smoking,

Released:
18-Nov-2019 4:05 PM EST
Newswise: Quit on The Great American Smokeout and Stay Quit with Monday

Quit on The Great American Smokeout and Stay Quit with Monday

Monday Campaigns

On November 21, people from across the country will participate in this year’s Great American Smokeout, “Day 1” of their journey toward a smoke-free life. Deciding to quit is a major step forward, but research shows that it may take current smokers an average of 30 attempts before they successfully quit smoking for a year or more. To remain committed to the quit in the weeks and months following GASO, use the power of Mondays to stay on track.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Cancer, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Smoking, JAMA,

Released:
18-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
Policy

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Popular Electronic Cigarette May Deliver Nicotine More Effectively Than Others, Researchers Say
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST
Released:
12-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST
Feature
APS_Profile.jpg

E-cigarettes Boost Infection Risk by Blocking Action of Immune Cells

American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study finds that e-cigarette vapor weakens the mobility and function of immune cells designed to fight infection. This reduced ability may increase the risk of bacterial illnesses in people who vape. The research is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.

Channels: All Journal News, Immunology, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Smoking,

Released:
14-Nov-2019 3:25 PM EST
Research Results
CS Logotype 2019.png
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Nov-2019 5:00 AM EST

Study: E-Cigarettes May Be More Harmful to Heart Health Than Tobacco

Cedars-Sinai

A new study from researchers at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that electronic nicotine delivery systems, including devices such as e-cigarettes, may be just as harmful to the heart, if not more, than traditional cigarettes. Downloadable video is available.

Channels: Addiction, Smoking, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Medical Meetings,

Released:
11-Nov-2019 5:00 AM EST
Expert Pitch
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2019 12:00 AM EST

Vaping not worth potential heart risk, researchers say

Ohio State University

Science hasn’t yet caught up with electronic cigarettes, leaving health care providers and users with many unknowns. But a new review of the research so far finds growing evidence that vaping can harm the heart and blood vessels.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Public Health, Smoking,

Released:
4-Nov-2019 8:40 AM EST
Expert Pitch
Newswise: Teens and Vaping: What Parents Need to Know

Teens and Vaping: What Parents Need to Know

Nuvance Health

E-cigarettes — especially flavored vaping products — are becoming more popular among teens. Vaping can cause serious health issues in teens, including e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI), and impaired brain development. Vaping can also put teens at an increased risk of developing other addictions too. Parents can talk with their kids about the dangers of vaping in a non-judgmental way. Pediatricians can also help by providing parents and teens with information and resources.

Channels: Children's Health, Family and Parenting, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Smoking, JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
6-Nov-2019 8:05 AM EST
Research Results
USC-logo.png

Teen vapers prefer mint flavored e-cigarettes, USC study shows

University of Southern California (USC)

A new USC study shows that mint was the most popular flavor of e-cigarettes used by U.S. teens in 2019, a finding that could impact proposed federal regulations intended to rein in soaring e-cig use among youth.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Children's Health, Government/Law, Public Health, Smoking, U.S. Politics, JAMA,

Released:
5-Nov-2019 1:05 PM EST
Feature

Law and Public Policy


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