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Newswise: Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models

Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models

Argonne National Laboratory

A team of environmental and computation scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are collaborating to use deep neural networks, a type of machine learning, to replace the parameterizations of certain physical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model, an extremely comprehensive model that simulates the evolution of many aspects of the physical world around us.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Meteorology, Technology, DOE Science News,

Released:
12-Nov-2019 3:55 PM EST
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Newswise: Bye-Bye, Beaches

Bye-Bye, Beaches

California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

Those beaches, as we know them today at least, almost certainly will not last. By the end of the 21st century, more than $150 billion in property along our coast could be under water. That's because the level of the sea is rising at an alarming rate, putting these areas at risk for devastating floods.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Meteorology, Floods, Local - California,

Released:
30-Oct-2019 3:45 PM EDT
Research Results

How Aerosols Affect Our Climate

Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Using a massive NASA dataset, Yale researchers have created a framework that helps explain just how sensitive local temperatures are to aerosols

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Meteorology, All Journal News,

Released:
17-Oct-2019 2:15 PM EDT
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Newswise: Lightning 'Superbolts' Form Over Oceans From November to February

Lightning 'Superbolts' Form Over Oceans From November to February

University of Washington

A study of superbolts, which release a thousand times more electrical energy in the low-frequency range than regular lightning bolts, finds they occur at very different times and places than regular lightning. Superbolts tend to strike over particular parts of the oceans, while regular lightning strikes over land.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Meteorology, All Journal News,

Released:
10-Sep-2019 3:20 PM EDT
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Augustana University Professor’s Research Leads to Surprising Mating Decision in Butterfly Species

Augustana University, South Dakota

The males of one species of butterfly are more attracted to females that are active, not necessarily what they look like, according to a recent research conducted at Augustana University.The paper, “Behaviour before beauty: Signal weighting during mate selection in the butterfly Papilio polytes,” found that males of the species noticed the activity levels of potential female mates, not their markings.

Channels: Environmental Science, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Children's Health, China Economics News, Civil Liberties, Climate Science, Clinical Trials, Cognition and Learning, Complementary Medicine, Crime and Forensic Science, Dermatology, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Dinosaurs, DOE Science News, Drug Resistance, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Economics,

Released:
8-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT
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