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Science

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oil, cooking oil, kitchen safety, Indoor Air Pollution, hot oil, Air Quality, explosive droplets, Cooking, Jeremy Marston, Chao Li, Tadd Truscott, Mohammad Mansoor, Texas Tech University, Utah State University, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

'Explosive' Hot Oil Droplets Could Hurt Your Skin -- and Air Quality

Cooking in a frying pan with oil can quickly become dangerous if “explosive” hot oil droplets jump out of the pan, leading to painful burns. But these droplets may be doing something even more damaging: contributing to indoor air pollution. A group of researchers exploring these “explosive droplets” will present their work to uncover the fluid dynamics behind this phenomenon during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Medicine

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weight stigma, Childhood Obesity

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Nov-2017 12:00 AM EST

Science

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Germanium, MICA, van der Waals, Epitaxy, Semiconductor, Thin Film, Aaron J. Littlejohn, Yu Xiang, Elma Rauch, Toh-Ming Lu, Gwo-Ching Wang, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Journal of Applied Physics

Strain-Free Epitaxy of Germanium Film on Mica

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Germanium was the material of choice in the early history of electronic devices, and due to its high charge carrier mobility, it’s making a comeback. It’s generally grown on expensive single-crystal substrates, adding another challenge to making it sustainably viable for most applications. To address this aspect, researchers demonstrate an epitaxy method that incorporates van der Waals’ forces to grow germanium on mica. They discuss their work in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Medicine

Life

Education

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pain, Healthcare, Research, Nursing, PhD, Doctoral, What Nurses Need to Know

What Nurses Need to Know: Pain Research

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Johns Hopkins Nursing researcher Janiece Taylor lets frustration drive her instead of holding her back. She has learned that it doesn't hurt to try something new.

Medicine

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cryo-EM, Cryo Electron Microscopy, Immune System, Pathogen detection

How the Immune System Identifies Invading Bacteria

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Never-before-seen images of mouse immune system proteins and bacterial bits reveal an inspection strategy that identifies pathogens.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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CPR, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, Army medical department, cardiac arrest, bystander CPR

Military Medical Officers Save Woman’s Life on Veterans Day

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Swift action by two Army medical department officers from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences saved the life of a Texas woman who went into cardiac arrest on Veterans Day.

Science

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AMP, Bioinformatics, NGS, Best Practices, CaP, AMIA

AMP Issues Consensus Clinical Validation Guideline Recommendations for Next-Generation Sequencing Bioinformatics Pipelines

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit molecular diagnostics professional society, today published 17 consensus recommendations to help clinical laboratory professionals achieve high-quality sequencing results and deliver better patient care.

Medicine

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AHA, American Heart Association, Meeting, Conference, Scientific Sessions, Michos, Chelko, Mesubi

News Tips from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions

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Anaheim Convention Center Anaheim, California Nov. 11-15

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Healthy Men Michigan’s Online Screening Tool Helps Men Take Control of their Mental Health

Study led by University of Maryland School of Social Work's Jodi Frey has resulted in more than 1,750 mental health screenings.

Science

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Newborn, newborn health, Newborn Health Tests, Biomedical Engineering, Africa, Uganda, Cell Phone App, Sensor, neonatal health, Developing Nations

Researchers Devise Sensors and Phone App to Find Early Signs of Sickness in Newborns

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Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering faculty and graduate students, global health experts and technology specialists will receive $100,000 to further develop a phone-based system enabling mothers in remote villages to spot serious health problems during newborn babies’ critical first week.







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