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University Of Chicago, Nanoscience, Nanoscience & Technology, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, Electronics, Basic Research, Chemistry & Materials, Chemistry

Scientists Make Atoms-Thick Post-It Notes for Solar Cells and Circuits

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In a study published Sept. 20 in Nature, UChicago and Cornell University researchers describe an innovative method to make stacks of semiconductors just a few atoms thick. The technique offers scientists and engineers a simple, cost-effective method to make thin, uniform layers of these materials, which could expand capabilities for devices from solar cells to cell phones.

Medicine

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Biophysics, Cancer, Drug Discovery, Titan, molecular dyanmaics, Molecular Dynamics

Titan Helps Researchers Suck Mystery Out of Cell’s ‘Vacuum Cleaners’

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In cancer cells, a membrane transport protein called P-glycoprotein, or Pgp, actively pumps anticancer drugs out of the cell, contributing to multidrug resistance. Recently, a team led by computational biophysicist Emad Tajkhorshid from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) used the Titan supercomputer to uncover new details about Pgp that could help the drug discovery community manipulate Pgp function.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, APOE, tau, Tauopathy

Newly ID’d Role of Major Alzheimer’s Gene Suggests Possible Therapeutic Target

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A new role has been identified for the major Alzheimer’s risk factor ApoE4, suggesting that targeting the protein may help treat the disease. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis show that ApoE4 exacerbates the brain damage caused by toxic tangles of a different Alzheimer’s-associated protein: tau. In the absence of ApoE, tau tangles did very little harm to brain cells.

Medicine

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Glycosylation, Stem Cell, Ricin

Glycosylation: Mapping Uncharted Territory

Glycosylation is the most abundant protein modification - over half of the proteins in our cells are ‘decorated’ with glycans. These sugar structures alter protein activities in all organisms – from bacteria to human - influencing fundamental processes, like protein folding and transport, cell migration, cell-cell interactions, and immune responses.

Medicine

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Microbiome, human microbiome, Gene, DNA, Cancer, GUT, Vagina, skin

Researchers Identify Millions of New Genes in the Human Microbiome

A new study of the human microbiome has uncovered millions of previously unknown genes from microbial communities in the human gut, skin, mouth, and vaginal microbiome, allowing for new insights into the role these microbes play in human health and disease.

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Comet or Asteroid? Hubble Discovers that a Unique Object is a Binary

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope helped an international team of astronomers find that an unusual object in the asteroid belt is, in fact, two asteroids orbiting each other that have comet-like features. These include a bright halo of material, called a coma, and a long tail of dust.

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Plants, Flowers, Pollinators, Scent, Fragrance, Color

Plants Combine Color and Fragrance to Procure Pollinators

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ho knew that it’s possible to predict the fragrance of a flower by looking at its color? This is true for many of the 41 insect-pollinated plant species growing in a Phrygana scrubland habitat on the Greek island of Lesbos. An international research team published their findings Sept. 4 in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Melanoma, Resistance, cross-talk

Tumor-infiltrating B Lymphocytes Promote Melanoma Progression and Resistance to Therapy

In a multi-institutional collaborative study, scientists at The Wistar Institute and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, have identified the role of tumor-infiltrating or tumor-associated B-cells (“TABs”) in melanoma progression and resistance to targeted therapy.

Medicine

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McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Jaroslaw Aronowski, M.D., Ph.D., Neutrophils, Hemorrhagic Stroke, Nature Communications, NIH Award, UTHealth , Lactoferrin

UTHealth Researchers Discover How to Train Damaging Inflammatory Cells to Promote Repair After Stroke

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Researchers at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth have discovered a way to turn neutrophils from toxic to helpful in hemorrhagic stroke.

Science

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Robotics, Artificial Muscle, 3D, 3D printing, Actuator, Soft Robot

One Step Closer to Lifelike Robots

Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a 3D-printable synthetic soft muscle that can lift 1,000 times its own weight. The muscle has intrinsic expansion ability and, unlike previous artificial muscles, it does not require an external compressor or high voltage equipment, signaling a breakthrough in the creation of soft robots that can move independently. The new material also has a strain density – an ability to expand – that is 15 times larger than natural muscle.







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