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Newswise: Texas A&M researchers uncover the science behind zapping bacteria with ultraviolet light

Texas A&M researchers uncover the science behind zapping bacteria with ultraviolet light

Texas A&M University

In the perennial clash between man and microbe, ultraviolet light has emerged as one of man’s powerful tools against many pathogens. Although ultraviolet light can wipe out several germs, the exact mechanisms that orchestrate the radiation’s damaging action have long been elusive. Texas A&M scientists can now explain how it works

Channels: All Journal News, Engineering, Microbiome, PNAS,

Released:
6-Dec-2019 11:20 AM EST
Newswise: 218695_web.jpg

A new study reveals the function of corpora amylacea to remove brain waste substances

Universidad De Barcelona

An article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) describes a new pathway in the central nervous system to expel waste substances from the brain through the creation of corpora amylacea (CA), aggregates formed by glucose polymers amassing waste products.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Neuro, Parkinson’s Disease, PNAS,

Released:
4-Dec-2019 12:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Big trucks, little emissions

Big trucks, little emissions

Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers reveal a new integrated, cost-efficient way of converting ethanol for fuel blends that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Channels: All Journal News, Energy, Green Tech, Travel and Transportation, PNAS, DOE Science News,

Released:
26-Nov-2019 4:25 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Study Shows Evolution Turns Genes Back On to Regain Function

Study Shows Evolution Turns Genes Back On to Regain Function

Stony Brook University

Genes often mutate and lose their function over long-term evolution, which could be good if that stops drug resistance or cancer. A study by Stony Brook University researchers, published online in PNAS, shows that evolution can exploit positive feedback (PF) within cells to restore gene function.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Engineering, Genetics, National Institutes of Health (NIH), PNAS,

Released:
25-Nov-2019 2:30 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: UCI-led study reveals how consuming alcohol affects the circadian rhythm of the liver leading to disease

UCI-led study reveals how consuming alcohol affects the circadian rhythm of the liver leading to disease

University of California, Irvine

Weekend binge drinking and chronic alcoholism have long been known to contribute to alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). A new study reveals how alcohol affects the liver's circadian rhythm, uncovering a potential new target for ALD treatments.

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Liver Disease, Aging, Cell Biology, PNAS, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
22-Nov-2019 5:00 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Mapping the pathway to gut health in HIV patients

Mapping the pathway to gut health in HIV patients

UC Davis Health

A UC Davis study found that Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria rapidly repaired damaged gut lining (known as leaky gut) in monkeys infected with chronic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an HIV-like virus. It linked chronically inflamed leaky gut to the loss of PPARα signaling and damage to mitochondria.

Channels: Grant Funded News, All Journal News, AIDS and HIV, Digestive Disorders, Immunology, PNAS,

Released:
19-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST
Research Results
Released:
19-Nov-2019 8:30 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Study reveals breach of ‘dancing’ barrier governs crystal growth

Study reveals breach of ‘dancing’ barrier governs crystal growth

University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago used computer-based simulations to analyze how atoms and molecules move in a solution and identified a general mechanism governing crystal growth that scientists can manipulate when developing new materials.

Channels: All Journal News, Chemistry, Engineering, PNAS,

Released:
12-Nov-2019 1:15 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Novel Study Documents Marked Slowdown of Cell Division Rates in Old Age

Novel Study Documents Marked Slowdown of Cell Division Rates in Old Age

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a novel study comparing healthy cells from people in their 20s with cells from people in their 80s, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have documented that cell division rates appear to consistently and markedly slow down in humans at older ages.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Cancer, Cell Biology, Seniors, Grant Funded News, PNAS,

Released:
22-Oct-2019 8:00 AM EDT
Research Results

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