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Article ID: 696345

Scientists Go to Great Heights to Understand Changes in Earth’s Atmosphere

University of California San Diego

Human activities have impacted the Earth’s atmosphere over time. To better understand the impact of the human biogeochemical footprint on Earth, scientists at the University of California San Diego are literally climbing mountains to study the planet’s sulfur cycle—an agent in cardiovascular fitness and other human health benefits and resources.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696098

Researchers Explain Ammonia Distribution in Earth’s Upper Atmosphere

University of Iowa

A new study co-led by University of Iowa researchers helps clarify how ammonia is present in Earth’s upper atmosphere. Using computer modeling, the researchers found ammonia molecules trapped in liquid cloud droplets are released during convection where these particles freeze and subsequently collide in the upper atmosphere.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695982

Volcanic Activity, Declining Ocean Oxygen Triggered Mass Extinction of Ancient Marine Organisms

Florida State University

Millions of years ago, powerful volcanoes pumped Earth's atmosphere full of carbon dioxide, draining the oceans of oxygen and driving widespread extinction of marine organisms. Could something similar be happening today?

Released:
12-Jun-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695946

Experiments at Berkeley Lab Help Trace Interstellar Dust Back to Solar System’s Formation

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Experiments conducted at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles – collected from Earth’s upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets – contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695611

Cornell research illuminates inaccuracies in radiocarbon dating

Cornell University

Radiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark — calling into question historical timelines.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695581

Ancient Greenland Was Much Warmer Than Previously Thought

Northwestern University

Just beyond the northwest edge of the vast Greenland Ice Sheet, Northwestern University researchers have discovered lake mud that beat tough odds by surviving the last ice age. The mud, and remains of common flies nestled within it, record two interglacial periods in northwest Greenland. Although researchers have long known these two periods — the early Holocene and Last Interglacial — experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in the Earth’s orbit, the mix of fly species preserved from these times shows that Greenland was even warmer than previously thought.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 4:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695570

Study Suggests Earth Could Have Supported Continental Crust, Life Earlier Than Thought

University of Chicago

The early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research from a group led by University of Chicago scientists.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695371

Thank the Moon for Earth’s Lengthening Day

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A new study that reconstructs the deep history of our planet’s relationship to the moon shows that 1.4 billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just over 18 hours. This is at least in part because the moon was closer and changed the way the Earth spun around its axis.

Released:
31-May-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695225

A new insight into the beetle-fungus symbiosis

Bowling Green State University

A Bowling Green State University microbiology team played an important role in a scientific discovery about alcohol benefitting fungus farming in beetles. The beetle research, headed by an entomologist Christopher Ranger of USDA-ARS, discovered that alcohol, specifically ethanol, is important for the beetles’ food production, and part of the logic for their attraction to alcohol.

Released:
29-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694913

Embryonic Gene Regulation Through Mechanical Forces

University of Vienna

sDuring embryonic development genetic cascades control gene activity and cell differentiation. In a new publication of the journal PNAS, the team of Ulrich Technau of the Department of Molecular Evolution and Development at the University of Vienna reported that besides the genetic program, also mechanical cues can contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development.

Released:
22-May-2018 5:05 AM EDT
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