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Malaria, Parasite, Infectious Disease

A Structural Clue to Attacking Malaria’s ‘Achilles Heel’

New research could boost the development of a more potent vaccine against the global killer.

Medicine

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Obesity, Genetics

Does this One Gene Fuel Obesity?

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New research from the Research Triangle suggests that variants in a gene called ankyrin-B – carried by millions of Americans – could cause people to put on pounds through no fault of their own.

Medicine

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, material sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, materials sciences, NERSC, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, University Of Virginia, CNMS, PNAS, Perovskite, perovskites, Solar Ce

Twisting Molecule Wrings More Power from Solar Cells

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Readily rotating molecules let electrons last, resulting in higher solar cell efficiency.

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Investment Portfolio Theory Helps Scientists Predict Animal Population Growth

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A study published in PNAS details a new “landscape portfolio” theory that is based on Markowitz’s “portfolio theory” in economics, melded with ecological landscape theory to predict population growth of living things.

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How Much Will We Pay for Something? Depends on the Value of What We’ve Just Encountered

The value of the products we encounter influences how much we’ll subsequently pay for other items, new neuroscience research has found. The results point to a previously undetected factor that affects consumer behavior.

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Education

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Wolters Kluwer New Quizzing Tool Delivers Personalized Learning for Millennials and Next Generation Medical Students and Residents

Wolters Kluwer Health unveiled a quizzing engine that delivers personalized learning and on-the-go insights to support how, when and where today’s medical students want to learn. The powerful quizzing tool allows students to track progress, view results and build customized quizzes to focus their training on specific subjects, topics or areas of weakness. It’s an important addition to contemporary medical education, which supports mobile access and tailors content to ensure medical students and residents more easily learn and retain information that prepares them for clinical practice.

Medicine

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HIV, virus budding, Virus, virus assembly, Biophysics, Modeling & Simulation, Chemistry, University Of Chicago, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Scientists Find Missing Clue to How HIV Hacks Cells to Propagate Itself

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Computer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the "budding" process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.

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Geology, Geophysics, Volcanoes, Magma, lava

Cool Idea: Magma Held in ‘Cold Storage’ Before Giant Volcano Eruption

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Long Valley, California, has long defined the “super-eruption.” About 765,000 years ago, a pool of molten rock exploded into the sky. Within one nightmarish week, 760 cubic kilometers of lava and ash spewed out in the kind of volcanic cataclysm we hope never to witness. A new study shows that the giant body of magma — molten rock — at Long Valley was much cooler before the eruption than previously thought.

Medicine

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Mass Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Lipid, Lipids, Infection, Bacteria, Inflammation, Therapeutic, Molecular, Pathogen

Lipids Influence How Sick You Get From a Bacterial Infection

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Researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the University of Maastricht deomonstrated their ability to use mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) in tracking disease progression, opening avenues for future research into the applicability of MSI for disease studies and the development of therapeutics that target lipids to treat infection.

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Aging, Chromatin, chromatin biology, DNA, Human Longevity

Scientists Decipher Mechanisms Underlying the Biology of Aging

Scientists have helped decipher the dynamics that control how our cells age, and with it implications for extending human longevity. The group used cutting-edge computational and experimental approaches to discover new details about chromatin silencing. The bottom line: balance is the key to aging.







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