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Medicine

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Ebola, Infectious Disease, Epidemic, Public Health

Trusted Messages Key to Counter Community Concerns During Disease Outbreak

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Utilizing messages focused on images created by local artists and written information communicated through local dialects proved essential to counter misperceptions during the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone, according to a study conducted in part by Muriel J. Harris, Ph.D., associate professor, University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences, Department of Health Promotion and Behavior Sciences.

Life

Education

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Science, Education, Career Advancement, graduate degree, Graduate Education, Science Education

Graduate Science Training Pays Dividends in and Out of the Lab

In a study published in PLOS ONE, UNC School of Medicine researchers found that skills developed during science PhD programs translate to success in a wide range of fields.

Science

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invasion biology, invasive animals, bird ecology, Policy & Politics, Complex Adaptive Systems

Monk Parakeets Invade Mexico

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In a new paper published in PLOS ONE, researchers describe a recent, rapid, and ongoing invasion of monk parakeets in Mexico, and the regulatory changes that affected the species’ spread.

Science

Life

Education

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Higher Ed, Faculty careers, PhD, PhD degree, Stem jobs, Engineering

One-Third of Ph.D.s Lose Interest in Academic Careers, but Not for Lack of Jobs

There are growing concerns that the challenges of landing a faculty job are discouraging young science and engineering Ph.D.s from pursuing careers in academia. The assumption is the majority aspire to a faculty career but drop out of the academic pipeline because there just aren’t enough tenure-track jobs to go around.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Reliance on ‘Gut Feelings’ Linked to Belief in Fake News

People who tend to trust their intuition or to believe that the facts they hear are politically biased are more likely to stand behind inaccurate beliefs, a new study suggests.

Science

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, High Flux Isotope Reactor, Spallation Neutron Source, OLCF, HFIR, SNS, Neutrons, neutron beams, Neutron, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Plos Biology, ORNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Cell Membrane, cell membranes, Cells, Cell B

First Look at a Living Cell Membrane

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Neutrons provide the solution to nanoscale examination of living cell membrane and confirm the existence of lipid rafts.

Medicine

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Aging, Public Health, Physical Function, Mobility

Small Increases in Physical Activity Reduce Immobility, Disability Risks in Older Adults

Adding 48 minutes of exercise per week is associated with improvements in overall mobility and decreases in risks of disability in older adults who are sedentary, finds a new study led by researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts.

Medicine

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Neuroscientists Focus on Cell Mechanism That Promotes Chronic Pain

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Researchers have discovered a new pain-signaling pathway in nerve cells that eventually could make a good target for new drugs to fight chronic pain.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Twitter, Big Data, Social Media, Happiness, research methods

Tweet Life vs Street Life: Exploring the Gap Between Content and Feelings

- Twitter is an unreliable witness to the world’s emotions - Conversation on Twitter has its own unique grammar, rules and culture - Online social life doesn’t always reflect offline social reality - Traditional social research methods are still vital when it comes to new media, according to new University of Warwick research published in PLOS ONE, a leading multidisciplinary journal.

Medicine

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Martin Makary, Health Care, Medical Care

Unneeded Medical Care is Common and Driven by Fear of Malpractice, Physician Survey Concludes

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A new national survey of more than 2,000 physicians across multiple specialties finds that physicians believe overtreatment is common and mostly perpetuated by fear of malpractice, as well as patient demand and some profit motives.







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