Curated News:

PLOS ONE

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
Newswise: Engineered Mosquitoes Cannot Be Infected with or Transmit Any Dengue Virus
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Engineered Mosquitoes Cannot Be Infected with or Transmit Any Dengue Virus

PLOS

Genetically engineered mosquitoes are resistant to multiple types of dengue virus (DENV), according to a study published January 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Prasad Paradkar of the Australian Animal Health Laboratory, and Omar Akbari of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, this is the first engineered approach that targets all types of DENV, which is crucial for effective disease suppression.

Channels: Cell Biology, Genetics, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Staff Picks, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Mosquitoes Engineered to Repel Dengue Virus

University of California San Diego

An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. The development marks the first engineered approach in mosquitoes that targets the four known types of dengue, improving upon previous designs that addressed single strains.

Channels: Children's Health, Engineering, Immunology, Zika Virus, Southeast Asia News, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
22-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
15-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Research Results
Newswise: 'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

'The blob,' food supply squeeze to blame for largest seabird die-off

University of Washington

When nearly one million common murres died at sea and washed ashore from California to Alaska in 2015 and 2016, it was unprecedented — both for murres, and across all bird species worldwide. Scientists from the University of Washington, the U.S. Geological Survey and others blame an unexpected squeeze on the ecosystem's food supply, brought on by a severe and long-lasting marine heat wave known as "the blob."

Channels: Birds, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Wildlife, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 7:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 3tf-a9Mb9zLN3uVC5NDZd_8PG9ukCSv0kmaYmS9MhcZBXCTJ7ZEqz9ElRkBe34XC4T3rvGmKTnpv3Xd1WATU_1ta_b0GC2FklUqvs_WIUhRDoIhI6mk0L1aCI32_UC5bReIE4V1ch0fyb7MuMd3UcpEER13kb24K2x30p81k8Ltw8t8F136mugCzu_phdjrLAHnL50J7BC5U8dfIYUs=s0-
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Marine Heatwave Likely Caused Mass Starvation of Seabirds off the U.S. West Coast and Alaska

PLOS

Unprecedented numbers of common murres—North Pacific seabirds—died between 2015 and 2016. A new analysis lays out the scope of this event and suggests a potential culprit: severely reduced food supplies resulting from unusually elevated sea temperatures.

Channels: Birds, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Nature, All Journal News, PLOS ONE, Staff Picks,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 11:40 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: xsi9yIwWA-9P0HdEl-h5dRqsI7b9n95JTATy8XIUZ8z6QZ0VX_plfoBZh5jHgV0jSLitL3mhGlNnAmZffBI3T4yJnEi7FzjGi9iawU9VeEAeNpQgw4C4hNRz-enMOYVzzQrwjmU1mcJh_OYl0Aw7jSBXecC9pLYor7Ig30i7mT2ZTl-tgeqDe5iOjl2q_vQHmRZGqiaJR2c7xhJiTVM=s0-
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Neandertals Went Underwater for Their Tools

PLOS

Neandertals collected clam shells and volcanic rock from the beach and coastal waters of Italy during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study published January 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paola Villa of the University of Colorado and colleagues.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Paleontology, Evolution and Darwin, PLOS ONE, Staff Picks,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 12:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: App uses voice analysis, AI to track wellness of people with mental illness
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST
Released:
14-Jan-2020 7:45 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Scientists Transform a BBQ Lighter Into a High-Tech Lab Device
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jan-2020 12:00 PM EST

Scientists Transform a BBQ Lighter Into a High-Tech Lab Device

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers have devised a straightforward technique for building a laboratory device known as an electroporator – which applies a jolt of electricity to temporarily open cell walls – from inexpensive components, including a piezoelectric crystal taken from a butane lighter.

Channels: Cell Biology, Chemistry, Energy, Engineering, Physics, National Institutes of Health (NIH), PLOS ONE, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
7-Jan-2020 9:40 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Break Point
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Break Point

Harvard Medical School

At a glance: Experiments in worms reveal the molecular damage caused by DEHP, a chemical commonly used to make plastics flexible DEHP interferes with proper cell division during egg formation, leads to excessive DNA breakage, alters chromosome appearance Abnormalities help explain known link between DEHP and human birth defects, male infertility If replicated in further research, the insights can help inform regulatory changes, consumer choice b

Channels: Children's Health, Environmental Health, Food and Water Safety, Public Health, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 1:10 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Persistence of gut microbial strains in twins, living apart after cohabitating for decades

Persistence of gut microbial strains in twins, living apart after cohabitating for decades

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Using a genomics strain-tracking bioinformatics tool, analyzed two metagenomic sequencing databases from pairs of twins — one for children who were still living together and the other from adult twins, ages 36 to 80, who then lived apart for periods from one to 59 years.

Channels: Cell Biology, Digestive Disorders, Genetics, Microbiome, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 3:30 PM EST
Research Results


3.3936