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Medicine

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Cancer, Immunotherapy, Cancer Immunity

How a Poorly Explored Immune Cell May Impact Cancer Immunity and Immunotherapy

The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body’s invaders can become defective. It’s what allows cancer to develop. So most research has targeted these co-called effector T-cells. But a new study takes a step back and considers: What if the problem isn’t with the effector T-cells but starts higher up the cellular chain?

Medicine

Science

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Cryo Electron Microscopy, cryo-EM, Immune activation

Detailed View of Immune Proteins Could Lead to New Pathogen-Defense Strategies

Biologists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley used cryo-EM to resolve the structure of a ring of proteins used by the immune system to summon support when under attack, providing new insight into potential strategies for protection from pathogens. The researchers captured the high-resolution image of a protein ring, called an inflammasome, as it was bound to flagellin, a protein from the whiplike tail used by bacteria to propel themselves forward.

Medicine

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cryo-EM, Cryo Electron Microscopy, Immune System, Pathogen detection

How the Immune System Identifies Invading Bacteria

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Never-before-seen images of mouse immune system proteins and bacterial bits reveal an inspection strategy that identifies pathogens.

Medicine

Channels:

zika, Infectious Diseases, Pregnancy, Immunity, acquired immunity, PLoS Pathogens, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Study Raises Possibility of Naturally Acquired Immunity Against Zika Virus

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Birth defects in babies born infected with Zika virus remain a major health concern. Now, scientists suggest the possibility that some women in high-risk Zika regions may already be protected and not know it. New research in PLOS Pathogens on Nov. 16, performed in mice, shows women who develop symptom-free Zika infections may be able to acquire immunity that would protect them from future infections and their offspring in a future pregnancy.

Medicine

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University of Vienna, Pavel Kovarik, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), Medical University of Vienna, Queen’s University Belfast, PLoS Pathogens, Natural Killer Cells, Superbug, Klebsiella, Multidrug Resistance, Human Health, Sepsis

Veni Vidi Vici: How Natural Killer Cells Conquer the Superbug Klebsiella

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Multidrug resistance of microbes poses a serious global threat to human health. Such resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae significantly reduce therapeutic options for the treatment of Klebsiella-induced, potentially fatal pneumonia or sepsis. Pavel Kovarik and his team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with colleagues at Queen’s University Belfast now report new insights into how immune cells communicate at the site of infection and join forces in the fight against Klebsiella infections. Their results, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, might be used for the development of alternatives to ineffective anti-microbial drugs.

Medicine

Channels:

Memorial Sloan , Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, MSK-IMPACT , clinicial trials, oncopanels

MSK-IMPACT™ Is the First Tumor-Profiling Multiplex Panel Authorized by the FDA, Setting a New Pathway to Market for Future Oncopanels

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today the authorization of MSK-IMPACT™ (which stands for integrated mutation profiling of actionable cancer targets), a high throughput, targeted-DNA-sequencing panel for somatic mutations. Created by the Department of Pathology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), MSK-IMPACT is a 468-gene oncopanel intended to detect gene mutations and other critical genetic aberrations in both rare and common cancers.

Medicine

Science

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UTEP, UTEP College of Science, cutaneous leishmaniasis, Biological Sciences, tropical diseases, Parasites, Vaccine, Rosa Maldonado, Ph.D., Igor Almeida, Ph.D.

UTEP Team Advances in Developing Vaccine for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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A research team at The University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing an effective human vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis, a tropical disease found in Texas and Oklahoma, and affecting some U.S. troops stationed in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Medicine

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Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, infants and allergy, CHILD study, Atopic March, Asthma, Allergies

Study Finds Asthma and Food Allergies Predictable at Age One

Using data from more than 2,300 children from across Canada participating in the CHILD Study, the researchers evaluated the presence of AD and allergic sensitization at age one. When the children were three years of age, the researchers performed a clinical assessment to determine the presence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and AD. The combined effect of AD and allergic sensitization was found to be greater than the sum of their individual effects, both on the risk of asthma and on reported food allergy.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Liver, Hepatology, Liver Cancer, Cell Biology, Genetics, Vaccines, Gastroenterology, Immunology, Hepatocellular Carcinoma

A New Strategy for Prevention of Liver Cancer Development

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Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective treatments or drugs. However, an unexpected finding made by a team of University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers sheds light on the development of a new strategy for prevention of liver cancer.

Medicine

Channels:

Immune System, Sleep, Nutritional Supplement, Wound, Wound Healing, Protein Supplement, Sleep Deprivation, skin, Skin Barrier Restoration

Getting Enough Sleep May Help Skin Wounds Heal Faster

Getting more sleep may help wound healing, and a nutrition supplement may also help, according to a new study. The paper, published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for November.







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