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Embargo will expire:
16-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
13-Dec-2019 12:50 AM EST

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Utah Coal Country Strike Team Signs First-of-its-Kind Agreement to Help Utah’s Coal Country

University of Utah

The Utah Coal Country Strike Team signed a first-of-its-kind agreement to help Utah’s Coal Country (Carbon and Emery counties) diversify their economy.

Channels: Business Ethics, Economics, Energy, Poverty,

Released:
12-Dec-2019 1:15 PM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
15-Dec-2019 6:30 PM EST
Released to reporters:
12-Dec-2019 10:45 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Dec-2019 6:30 PM EST

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Announcement

Children Much More Likely to Die After Surgery in Poor Countries

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Children in low resourced countries are 100-200 times more likely to die after surgery than children in wealthy countries, according to a first-of-its-kind study published in Anesthesiology.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Healthcare, Poverty, Surgery, African News,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 2:55 PM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Dec-2019 3:00 PM EST

Natural Toxins in the Global Food Supply Continue to Threaten the Health of Underprivileged Communities

Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

Naturally occurring chemicals in the global food supply are known to pose a burden on worldwide health. New studies have found that a certain foodborne toxin, in addition to its known health effects,, is also linked to vaccine resistance, and for the first time the global burden of disease from foodborne arsenic, lead, cadmium, and methyl mercury has been quantified.. The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) will present new studies as part of its Global Disease Burden Caused by Foodborne Chemicals and Toxins symposium on Monday, Dec. 9 from 1:30-3:00 p.m. as part of its 2019 Annual Meeting at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This symposium will provide updates to a 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) publication which analyzed the disease burdens caused by these toxins.

Channels: Agriculture, All Journal News, Cancer, Children's Health, Food and Water Safety, Immunology, Liver Disease, Poverty, Public Health, Vaccines, Global Food News, Scientific Meetings,

Released:
20-Nov-2019 3:15 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: “Seeing Others Suffer Is Too Stressful”: Why People Buy, Trade, Donate Medications on the Black Market
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Dec-2019 12:00 PM EST

“Seeing Others Suffer Is Too Stressful”: Why People Buy, Trade, Donate Medications on the Black Market

University of Utah Health

Altruism and a lack of access and affordability are three reasons why people with chronic illnesses are turning to the “black market” for medicines and supplies, new research shows. Scientists at University of Utah Health and University of Colorado ran surveys to understand why individuals are looking beyond pharmacies and medical equipment companies to meet essential needs. The reasons listed were many but centered on a single theme: traditional healthcare is failing them.

Channels: All Journal News, Diabetes, Healthcare, Poverty, Pharmaceuticals, Staff Picks,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 2:45 PM EST
Research Results
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Lack of specialists doom rural sick patients

Saint Louis University

Residents of rural areas are more likely to be hospitalized and to die than those who live in cities primarily because they lack access to specialists, recent research found.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Poverty, Rural Issues, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease,

Released:
4-Dec-2019 11:05 AM EST
Research Results
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Gun Violence, Bullying and Poverty Again Named as Top Three Social Concerns for Youth by Chicago Parents

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Consistent with last year, Chicago parents again selected gun violence, bullying/cyberbullying and poverty as the top three social problems for children and adolescents in the city, according to the latest survey results released by Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH). Hunger was new to this year’s top 10 list of social issues facing youth, with 62 percent of parents across all community areas in Chicago considering it a big problem.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Education, Family and Parenting, Poverty, Guns and Violence,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 4:15 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Young Children Receiving Housing Vouchers Had Lower Hospital Spending Into Adulthood

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Young children whose household received a housing voucher were admitted to the hospital fewer times and incurred lower hospital costs in the subsequent two decades than children whose households did not receive housing vouchers, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, In the Home, Poverty, JAMA,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 11:50 AM EST
Research Results
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Dads in prison can bring poverty, instability for families on the outside

University of Washington

A new University of Washington study finds that families with a father in prison tend to live in neighborhoods with higher poverty.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Family and Parenting, In the Home, Poverty, Race and Ethnicity,

Released:
26-Nov-2019 3:45 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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