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WINE, Australia, salt-tolerance, grapevine, Salinity, plantbreeding, Genetics, Genetic Markers, rootstocks

New Discovery to Accelerate Development of Salt-Tolerant Grapevines

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A recent discovery by Australian scientists is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines.

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Iowa State University, Iowa State, soil, Organic Matter, Greenhouse Emissions, Greenhouse Gas, Agriculture, Wetland, Wetlands

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Nov-2017 5:00 AM EST

Science

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Archeology, China, Eurasia, Fertile Crescent, Barley, Wheat, food globalization, Tibet, India, Domestication

Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet

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First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis,

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Soybeans, Soybean, Sudden Death Syndrome, Plant Disease, Agriculture, Arabidopsis, Iowa State

New Research Details Genetic Resistance to Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybeans

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Incorporating a combination of genes from the model plant Arabidopsis may build high levels of resistance to sudden death syndrome in soybeans, according to research from an Iowa State University agronomist. A recently published study points to one gene in particular as a likely candidate to bolster resistance.

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UF/IFAS Citrus REC Celebrates 100th Anniversary: See How Science Helps Agriculture

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University of Florida, citrus growers to celebrate a 100-year partnership.

Science

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Rain, Raindrops, Pathogens, Crops, Dispersal, splash, Grain, Wheat, Plants, Seungho Kim, Hope Gruszewski, Todd Gidley, David G. Schmale III, Sunghwan Jung, Virginia Tech, Division of Fluid Dynamics, Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS, DFD

Raindrops Splash Pathogens Onto Crops

Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses or fungi, cause harmful plant disease and often lead to the destruction of agricultural fields. With many possible dispersal methods, it can often be difficult to assess the damage of a pathogen’s impact before it’s too late. At the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, researchers from Virginia Tech will present their work on rain drop dispersal mechanisms of rust fungus on wheat plants.

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Soil Carbon Sinks, Coral Adaptation, Earth's Oxygen History, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

Science

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Plant Sciences, green fuel production, mass spectometry, photosystem II, Cyanobacteria

Water World

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Following the paths of radicals and finding many damaged residues because of incredibly accurate, fast and sensitive mass spectrometry, three Washington University scientists studied the great granddaddy of all photosynthetic organisms — a strain of cyanobacteria — to develop the first experimental map of that organism’s water world.

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Emsl, Cellulose, Spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, scientific reports, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Washington State University, WSU, Biofuel, Biofuel Production, Biofuels, Renewable Energy, renewable energy development, Plants, Plant, Plant Cell Walls, plant

Unplugging the Cellulose Biofuel Bottleneck

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Molecular-level understanding of cellulose structure reveals why it resists degradation and could lead to cost-effective biofuels.

Science

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Water Quality Research, Phosphates, Nitrates, Heavy Metals, Duckweed, Upper Big Sioux River Watershed Project, U.S. Geological Survey, South Dakota Water Resources Institute, South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station

Aquatic Plant May Help Remove Contaminants From Lakes

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A tiny aquatic plant called duckweed might be a viable option for remove phosphorus, nitrates, nitrites and even heavy metals from lakes, ponds and slow-moving waterbodies.







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