Feature:

Psychology and Psychiatry

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Psychology and Psychiatry

Showing results

110 of 3302
crd-logo.gif

Article ID: 717820

'Key player' identified in genetic link to psychiatric conditions

Cardiff University

Scientists have identified a specific gene they believe could be a key player in the changes in brain structure seen in several psychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia and autism.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 2:05 PM EDT
WoltersKluwer_CMYK-ol.jpg

Article ID: 717807

Trauma Contributes to Depression Risk in Central American Immigrant Mothers

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Traumatic stress is a key factor associated with depression among immigrant mothers from Central America, reports a study in Family and Community Health: The Journal of Health Promotion & Maintenance – part of a special theme issue devoted to "Family Health in Hispanic Communities" that includes guest editors Paul Branscum, PhD, RD, and Daphne C. Hernandez, PhD, MSEd The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Newswise: Meaningful PTSD Symptom Decrease May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Article ID: 717810

Meaningful PTSD Symptom Decrease May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Saint Louis University Medical Center

Research from Saint Louis University finds treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) that leads to an improvement in symptoms was associated with a 49 percent lower risk of incident type 2 diabetes. The study, “Clinically Meaningful PTSD Improvement and Risk for Type 2 Diabetes,” by Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., professor in Family and Community Medicine, was published Aug. 21 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
image001.png
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Aug-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717685

Is it autism? The line is getting increasingly blurry

Universite de Montreal

If the current trend in diagnostic practices holds, the definition of autism may get too blurry to be meaningful, a Canadian research team finds.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 3:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

pss-logo.gif

Article ID: 717789

Fake news can lead to false memories

Association for Psychological Science

Voters may form false memories after seeing fabricated news stories, especially if those stories align with their political beliefs, according to research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Law and Public Policy

New Logo.png
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 717528

Study Supports Link Between Pollution and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

University of Chicago Medical Center

Based on analysis of large population data sets from both the United States and Denmark, a new study found poor air quality associated with increased rates of bipolar disorder and major depression in both countries.

Released:
15-Aug-2019 12:15 PM EDT
UM-logo.png

Article ID: 717710

Low Levels of Vitamin D in Elementary School Could Spell Trouble in Adolescence

University of Michigan

Vitamin D deficiency in middle childhood could result in aggressive behavior as well as anxious and depressive moods during adolescence, according to a new University of Michigan study of school children in Bogotá, Colombia.

Released:
20-Aug-2019 10:30 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: City Parks Lift Mood as Much as Christmas, Twitter Study Shows
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 717534

City Parks Lift Mood as Much as Christmas, Twitter Study Shows

University of Vermont

New research shows that visitors to urban parks use happier words and express less negativity on Twitter than before their visit—and that their elevated mood lasts for up to four hours. The effect is so strong that it’s equivalent to the mood spike on Christmas, the happiest day each year on Twitter. With increasing urbanization and mood disorders, this research may have powerful implications for public health and urban planning.

Released:
15-Aug-2019 1:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Comparing Your House to Your Neighbors’ Can Lead to Dissatisfaction

Article ID: 717673

Comparing Your House to Your Neighbors’ Can Lead to Dissatisfaction

Iowa State University

Satisfaction with your home can depend on its size compared to your neighbors’ homes, according to new Iowa State University research. Daniel Kuhlmann, assistant professor of community and regional planning, found that people are more likely to be dissatisfied with their house if it is smaller than their neighbors’.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 3:20 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 717647

Need a Mental Break? Avoid Your Cellphone, Researchers Say

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Using a cellphone to take a break during mentally challenging tasks does not allow the brain to recharge effectively and may result in poorer performance, Rutgers researchers found.

Released:
19-Aug-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


Showing results

110 of 3302

Chat now!